96' 23 SC Parker Tank Replacement

Classic Parker Boat Forum

Help Support Classic Parker Boat Forum:

qsweet

Active member
Joined
Jun 16, 2020
Messages
44
Reaction score
1
Location
Charlestown, RI (Block Island Sound)
The time has come. Original tank. Really stinks in the bilge. I am glad it happened now though so I can get a head start. I know alot of people have done this already. Was wondering if there is any good threads that document it the best. I will be doing it myself. Any tips tricks or insight would be greatly appreciated. I will share my process as I go along and would love any feedback. Thanks!
 

qsweet

Active member
Joined
Jun 16, 2020
Messages
44
Reaction score
1
Location
Charlestown, RI (Block Island Sound)
Okay so I am looking for some input. Pulled the tank the other day and ripped out all the foam. Couple holes on the bottom back end of the tank where water would leak down the side and sit. The foam on the sides was actually pretty dry. After I pulled it I noticed the pipe connecting the front bilge with the aft was broken. Pics will be after.

Warthog- should I be replacing that pipe and foaming in the new tank and sealing it like you have said in other posts? I have seen alot where people dont foam it in to let air get all the way around it. Curious on which is better. Others input is welcome too.

What should I be replacing that pipe with? Just pvc? Any tips on how to get the pieces out on each end that is glassed in?
Does the tank sit on that pipe or does it bottom out before is gets down to the pipe?

I am planning on light sanding the coffin and painting it just to clean things up since I will have time while the tank is being built.

I am located in RI. Looking for recommendations from anyone who suggests a place to have my tank made. I would like 3/16" thick.

Anything else i may have looked over feel free to bring it to my attention.

Thanks!
 

warthog5

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 23, 2006
Messages
3,613
Reaction score
251
Location
Pensacola, Fl.
Yes just fix the pipe with PVC.

Warthog- should I be replacing that pipe and foaming in the new tank and sealing it like you have said in other posts? I have seen alot where people dont foam it in to let air get all the way around it. Curious on which is better. Others input is welcome too.
Here is what people do Not understand.....There Is No air flow.....Not unless you build it to do so....IE: A way for air to be forced into that cavity and exit it.

The attempt has been to use solar piehole covers....and thats the best your gonna do.

That foam Locks that massive weight it.....I have heard of folks not foaming and fastening the tank in.....Then tank broke loose....Now you have a Giant Wrecking Ball BOMB! Lets just say you have a 75gal tank.....That tank is gonna weigh about 40lbs.
Gas weighs aprox. 6.5lbs per gal......So 40 + 487 = round figure 525lbs

That is a LOT of weight to be hammering on your boat if it broke loose.

The Foam Locks it in ...Never getting a chance to budge.

I'll say it again....Coal Tar the tank.....Fasten the tank.......4lb Foam the tank......Cut foam flush with top of tank and Fiberglass over the foam.....Making sure if and when water leaks into the fuel coffin it will never get into the foam.
 

capecodparker2320

Active member
Joined
Dec 26, 2018
Messages
44
Reaction score
7
Since you are in RI, try Luther's Welding. I believe they are located in Bristol. Im in eastern MA and had them build a 63 gal tank for a Boston Whaler six years ago. Tank fit perfectly and they even delivered to my house for a very modest fee.
 

capecodparker2320

Active member
Joined
Dec 26, 2018
Messages
44
Reaction score
7
I just remembered that in another thread someone mentioned to have the fabricator add a flange on the inside top surface of tank for the fuel sender, which is a great idea. That way its possible to have sufficient thread engagement for the screws that seal and hold the fuel level sender. Ideally you want to have a thread engagement that is at least two times the screw diameter in aluminum. If not specified, the fabricator will use theaded inserts which do not last in marine environments.
 

qsweet

Active member
Joined
Jun 16, 2020
Messages
44
Reaction score
1
Location
Charlestown, RI (Block Island Sound)
good idea capecod, im actually waiting for a quote from luthers as we speak! seems like they have a good reputation

warthog-okay that is the route im headed. when i put the foam in though, will it make it underneath at all like it was when i pulled it? or does it not matter and as long as the sided are locked in i am good

will the fiberglass bond well to the coal tar coated tank?
 

warthog5

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 23, 2006
Messages
3,613
Reaction score
251
Location
Pensacola, Fl.
Yes it will go underneath...There is a lot to pouring the foam.....Tape/plastic the deck around the tank....Chemicals all in the boat.....small pours 12oz mix's..... Then let it rise.....
It is a Black epoxy coating No problem :)

I just remembered that in another thread someone mentioned to have the fabricator add a flange on the inside top surface of tank for the fuel sender,
That was me....I've built them before....3/8in thick alum ring with the correct bolt pattern
 

PastTheBarb

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 13, 2018
Messages
48
Reaction score
6
Ill be picking up my tank in a few days. Ill post a picture of the sending unit ring. Also Im planning to follow Warthogs method on the tank install.
I found Coal tar epoxy at worldpaintsupply.com Corotech $65 for a 1 gallon kit. Has anyone used this product?
 

qsweet

Active member
Joined
Jun 16, 2020
Messages
44
Reaction score
1
Location
Charlestown, RI (Block Island Sound)
okay so, warthog, lol, let me know what you think about this article that gives direction on how to install a tank. I am heavily leaning towards your method but this method seems to make a case too. As far as locking the tank in the top of the tank has 4 tabs that get screwed into the stringer. My concern with the articles method is that his is for a square/rectangular tank and the one I am doing is tapered/trapezoidal. One last thing.... I know it makes sense if you seal off the entire tank compartment, but wouldnt change in temperature still cause condensation to form inside that compartment/around the tank? Thanks.

Pastthebarb- That would get great. Luthers told me that they reinforce the sending flange so we shall see what they come up with. Also I have not heard of that stuff. Most of the posts I have seen have been the rustoleum coal tar epoxy but im sure its fine.
 

Attachments

sailmaster

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 18, 2015
Messages
106
Reaction score
16
Yes just fix the pipe with PVC.



Here is what people do Not understand.....There Is No air flow.....Not unless you build it to do so....IE: A way for air to be forced into that cavity and exit it.

The attempt has been to use solar piehole covers....and thats the best your gonna do.

That foam Locks that massive weight it.....I have heard of folks not foaming and fastening the tank in.....Then tank broke loose....Now you have a Giant Wrecking Ball BOMB! Lets just say you have a 75gal tank.....That tank is gonna weigh about 40lbs.
Gas weighs aprox. 6.5lbs per gal......So 40 + 487 = round figure 525lbs

That is a LOT of weight to be hammering on your boat if it broke loose.

The Foam Locks it in ...Never getting a chance to budge.

I'll say it again....Coal Tar the tank.....Fasten the tank.......4lb Foam the tank......Cut foam flush with top of tank and Fiberglass over the foam.....Making sure if and when water leaks into the fuel coffin it will never get into the foam.
Agreed I have seen tanks that got loose breaking the tank hatch
Incredible amount of mass when you hit or launch off a wave.
The further forward the tank the greater g force
NFPA used to have a 10 g standard for tanks in forward third of vessel
 

pelagic2530

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Joined
Nov 17, 2006
Messages
1,455
Reaction score
218
Location
Indian River, DE / Norfolk, VA
okay so, warthog, lol, let me know what you think about this article that gives direction on how to install a tank. I am heavily leaning towards your method but this method seems to make a case too. As far as locking the tank in the top of the tank has 4 tabs that get screwed into the stringer. My concern with the articles method is that his is for a square/rectangular tank and the one I am doing is tapered/trapezoidal. One last thing.... I know it makes sense if you seal off the entire tank compartment, but wouldnt change in temperature still cause condensation to form inside that compartment/around the tank? Thanks.

Pastthebarb- That would get great. Luthers told me that they reinforce the sending flange so we shall see what they come up with. Also I have not heard of that stuff. Most of the posts I have seen have been the rustoleum coal tar epoxy but im sure its fine.
I was agreeing with that article right up to the point where they suggested that some beads of 5200 alone are going to be enough to hold the tank in place 😳

I’ve seen similar installations where the tank is supported all the way around with plastic spacers between the stringers and bulkheads, so there was literally nowhere for it to move. But basically gluing the tank in with a few beads of 5200??? Maybe for a small tank in a sailboat, but for a big heavy tank in a powerboat that’s not going to cut it.

In reality, using Warthog’s method to avoid water leaking into the foam from above and coating the tank so that any condensation doesn’t contact the aluminum should be more than adequate for many many years of service.
 

qsweet

Active member
Joined
Jun 16, 2020
Messages
44
Reaction score
1
Location
Charlestown, RI (Block Island Sound)
okay, that is the route I am going to go. How should i seal the top of the tank where the tabs are that screw into the stringers? Do i just go right over them and worry about trying to get it out if I ever have to cross that road again? Is there any prep that goes into coating the tank other than just making sure it is clean? Thanks.
 
Top