Anchor line compartment

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Mike cape

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I have a 2007 2120 s/c. I have a problem with water filling up the anchor line compartment in bow. It is filling up and running down into cuddly are of pilot house( s/c). Anyone having this problem. My boat is on mooring so I can’t check it everyday.
 

knotflying

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It is my understanding that the anchor lockers have a limber hole that let the water run to the bilge. Not the optimal setup. I would prefer a shorter locker with a sealed bottom and a ole out the hull. With that said, I would pull out all your rode and make sure your drain hole is cleared.
 

Mike cape

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It is my understanding that the anchor lockers have a limber hole that let the water run to the bilge. Not the optimal setup. I would prefer a shorter locker with a sealed bottom and a ole out the hull. With that said, I would pull out all your rode and make sure your drain hole is cleared.
Thanks !
Just bought boat will check on drain.
 

Andy

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It is my understanding that the anchor lockers have a limber hole that let the water run to the bilge. Not the optimal setup. I would prefer a shorter locker with a sealed bottom and a ole out the hull. With that said, I would pull out all your rode and make sure your drain hole is cleared.
There is a lot of discussion on this issue on this site.... I've commented (aka, bitched about!) this more than I should have... In short, with all the pilothouse Parkers, they should have raised the 'floor' of the anchor-rode locker a few inches, drilled a hole, installed a clam-shell diverter and drained the water out of the locker right where is comes in! How simple is this? Why run the water all the way through the boat, to the 'arse-end' and then try to pump it out? It makes no sense.
 

knotflying

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I agree with Andy. I have not examined the issue and would have to see how far I would have to raise the floor to accomplish the desired outcome. One word of caution though. If you have to raise the floor too much then you can have an issue with the rode building up and then jamming while retrieving. On my previous boat (not a Parker) it had the clamshell drain, but because of the decreased depth you had to go to the bow and lay the rode in as it was retrieved. They had the windless controls on the deck as well and I assume it was for this very reason. Many owners complained about always having to go to the helm to retrieve the anchor. My point is, you don't want to fix one issue and create another.
 

Andy

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I agree with Andy. I have not examined the issue and would have to see how far I would have to raise the floor to accomplish the desired outcome. One word of caution though. If you have to raise the floor too much then you can have an issue with the rode building up and then jamming while retrieving. On my previous boat (not a Parker) it had the clamshell drain, but because of the decreased depth you had to go to the bow and lay the rode in as it was retrieved. They had the windless controls on the deck as well and I assume it was for this very reason. Many owners complained about always having to go to the helm to retrieve the anchor. My point is, you don't want to fix one issue and create another.
The 'floor' would need to be raised a couple inches above the water line; slightly below the bow-eye. Since the floor is at the bottom of the 'funnel', there is just a little space lost in the overall volume for anchor-rode storage. But folks have different anchor-rode-length needs, and that plays a big role in how well it feeds/fills the rode-locker. Here in eastern NC I seldom anchor in deep water (typically anchor in 5' -15'... occasionally around 20' -30)' so I don't need to carry as much line and chain as some others may need.... I've not had the need to hand-feed the line into the locker; the Lewmar does all the work, without a hitch. (that is, after I fixed the bow-roller issue)....
A note about anchor line, and for that matter, dock lines. All nylon lines are not created equal; there are differences in their ply-ability. It's not just in the 'brand' of line, it also depends on the chemical make-up they happen to get with a given 'batch' from their supplier. (BOAT/US had a great article about this 15?/ many years ago). Some nylon anchor line is 'stiff'. It will not easily lay down when being fed into the anchor-rode-locker. Some line is much more 'supple/soft', and easily lays flat. Stiff line, especially after use in saltwater becomes even more stiff. (Needs cleaning and rinsing more often). I have, stored in my shop, dozens of dock-lines and anchor-lines, of various diameters (3/8, 7/16, 1/2, 5/8 and 3/4 inch) from a wide variety of manufactures. Some are nearly too stiff to use. Some are supple. Some are relatively new; some are 40 years old. Some from the same manufacturer share both characteristics, so it's not just a 'brand-name' issue. I have washed them (mild soap; don't use bleach) and soaked them in fabric softener, some times for days. The fabric softener has helped a little; just a little.
 
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