Bronze scupper tube cracked

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805mike

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Hey everybody. Here’s a picture of my starboard scupper. It looks like it is cracked all the way through. Wondering if this is a big issue or not? Is there gelcoat under the tubes ? My fear is that there is not gelcoat, and that water could be slowly seeping into the core.52FF867B-7336-44BF-AA86-95EBD1210F86.jpeg1697CC44-0B88-4A74-AA9F-2D7030C1924E.jpeg
 

Antidote

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It "should be" sealed; but, unfortunately, it doesn't mean it is. It wouldn't be sealed by gel coat. More likely, if it is sealed, that epoxy was used; but, again no guarantee.
 

99Parker2520

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I think warthog had a thread on his repair with PVC pipe. I also need to do something about mine. I may be sorry for keeping it on the to do list and not doing.
 

pelagic2530

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Hey everybody. Here’s a picture of my starboard scupper. It looks like it is cracked all the way through. Wondering if this is a big issue or not? Is there gelcoat under the tubes ? My fear is that there is not gelcoat, and that water could be slowly seeping into the core.View attachment 31902View attachment 31903
It’s most likely not sealed, at least not effectively. More than likely the factory slapped it in there with some sealant, which won’t adequately protect your core in this case.

Short term, you can likely get away with applying your favorite marine sealant over the crack to prevent water intrusion. But long term fix you’ll need to replace the tube. Many people elect to replace with PVC vice the brass tubes, to avoid the brass cracking again in the future. Here’s my write-up:1997 1700 Overhaul Project
 

warthog5

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think warthog had a thread on his repair with PVC pipe.
Yes...I actually used the "Gray" Electrical PVC...It has UV protection in it.

You dig the Brass out....Then drill the hole bigger....The PVC of the correct size has a bigger OD.
Reinstalling the brass is asking for the same thing to happen again......AND call's for a special tool, but I've seen them cobbled together with thread all and other pieces.

My was you cut the PVC slightly short of the thickness of the transom. Then create a nice fillet at the ends with epoxy.
 

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Legal Bill

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If you can find a guy who has the tool, replacing the brass is no big deal and not very expensive. Should last 15 years.
 

pelagic2530

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Yes...I actually used the "Gray" Electrical PVC...It has UV protection in it.

You dig the Brass out....Then drill the hole bigger....The PVC of the correct size has a bigger OD.
Reinstalling the brass is asking for the same thing to happen again......AND call's for a special tool, but I've seen them cobbled together with thread all and other pieces.

My was you cut the PVC slightly short of the thickness of the transom. Then create a nice fillet at the ends with epoxy.
I’ll confirm that this is the way to go. I used the white SCH40 stuff, it’s working out fine and the boat stays covered so I’m not worried about the UV rays, but it’s thicker so you’ve got to make a bigger hole.
 

sailmaster

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I own the tools but do the PVC repair on my boats. Whatever you do make sure you seal the plywood
Atwood makes a repair kit in Polyethylene that snaps in to place in existing 1 inch hole
 

805mike

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Thanks for all the help. I think I’ll just seal it for now and deal with it later.
 

Bodick93

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It looks like yours was overflared or the transom swelled. The tools are very simple and inexpensive if you choose to go that route.
 

warthog5

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but it’s thicker so you’ve got to make a bigger hole.
While making the hole bigger can be a pain......It has several advantages. 1] your exposing new clean wood to get the best penetration when wetted out with resign.....2] It lowers the scupper slightly......This assists in getting that pesky little bit of water gone , that Always sits and collects dirt
 

tomc585

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The tools bodick posted are for the 1", you need the 1.25" which cost way more.
I changed out all 4 of mine this past spring with brass because I already invested in the tool and brass tubes.
I recommend going the PVC route as suggested. Also, upgrade to the ball scuppers.
Here's a link to my adventure
1801 Scupper tube replacement
 
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Bodick93

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1.25" flaring tools are $35-$40. No experience with either.
 

tomc585

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Yes, Bodick is correct. I do see the price did come down on the 1.25" tool. I was stuck for time and also paid Covid mark up. I wish I had gone the PVC route but my epoxy lined holes and new brass tubes should last my lifetime.
 
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