Fuel line blocked ?

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ReelDeal

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Hey there,

I have a 2005 2520XLD with twin 2009 Yamaha F150s. Did standard service (oil, fuel filters, water/ fuel separators, water pumps, etc) took her out and ran great. Boat sat for a few months and took her out and starboard motor died after a few min at low rpms. Couldn’t get it restarted so I motored back to ramp on the port motor. Fuel priming bulb wouldn’t get hard no matter how long I pumped, just air, zero fuel. I replaced the priming bulb with no change. I disconnected main fuel line running to the water fuel separator and couldn’t get any gas to pull thru. I tried putting my mouth on the line to draw fuel into the line in case there was air blocking fuel. I even tried pumping compressed air into the line to clear any blockage with no luck. It’s completely blocked. I’m thinking the pickup tube or anti siphon valve is blocked but I really don’t want to pull up my entire deck to access the aft end of the tank. Anyone know how to locate the exact location of the pickup tube so I can create a small access hole and cover it with a pancake top? Would Parker be able to tell me this? Thanks for the input I’m stumped. I’ve been able to solve every problem thus far but this one got me. Has anyone else experienced this ???
Thanks,
Brett
ReelDeal Fishing
 

warthog5

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You need to take the antisiphon fitting apart.....Remove the spring and knock the ball out of it....Reassemble and you'll have fixed it. It's on the top of the tank where the fuel line plugs in.
 

ReelDeal

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I don't see any access to the the pickup tube. There's one small access hole above the main fill line and vent tube for tank inspection but no access to the pickups. I assume they are on the aft end on the top of the tank. I can drill a new access hole to make the fix but I need to know exactly where to drill first
 

Antidote

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The deck plate you are looking for is the one in the foreground of the first picture. The second picture is what is under it.IMG_2800.jpegIMG_2514.jpeg
 

ReelDeal

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Unfortunately that access hole doesn’t exist on my boat. I have a fish hold in the deck right where your access plate it and a 60 ga bait tank in front of that. Weird.
 

Phil

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I’m not sure this applies to the 2520 but on my 2320 you can see a 4” X 6” cutout in the bilge where the fuel lines goes to the engine. Very tight down there but better than nothing. From the pic attached, you can see the pie plate on top. The pickups are directly below. Maybe you can put a tape measure on the cutout and a reference point on the bilge hatch then transfer it on top and cut a small 3 inch test hole to see the exact location of the pickup.bilge IMG_0327.jpg
 

tomc585

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I find it hard to believe that there was no access port cut in from the factory unless it was ordered that way.
 

Antidote

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Unfortunately that access hole doesn’t exist on my boat. I have a fish hold in the deck right where your access plate it and a 60 ga bait tank in front of that. Weird.
I'm guessing your fish hold/bait tank is using that access for plumbing. Do you have access to look under it?
 

Fishaddict

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Just fixed same issue on my 1801. Replaced valve with straight barbed fitting 3/8 by 3/8 and enlarged access to 8 in. Soak threads with atf/acetone 50/50 mixture and hold pick up tube square with another wrench for contra torque otherwise you risk braking off pick up tube knot welding on the tank.
 

GotChrist?

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I find it hard to believe that there was no access port cut in from the factory unless it was ordered that way.
I looked at a NorthCoast pilot house 2 years ago at the boat show. I asked the dealer were the inspection/access plates for the fuel tank was. He looked and said, I guess there isn't any. I asked on the Fb group BOU if anyone had the boat. One of the owners sons is on the group so I asked him about it. He became mad and was stubborn on the subject. They don't believe there is need for access hatches to replace the sending unit or the hose attachment points. He had never seen the need to replace them in his young life. In like manner, Parker hides the Lenco trim tab connections somewhere under the deck so that owners have to cut and splice the lines rather than unplug/plug when replacement is needed. Maintenance gets very little thought.
 

warthog5

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Boats have been on Seatows hook due to the antisiphon valve failing Closed.

It's not as uncommon as people think.

As to No access ....That just Piss Poor design..
 

John_Madison CT

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I once had an problem with my engine stumbling at speed. To make a long story short, it was crud in the Anti-siphon valve. I took it out and replaced with a single barbed fitting. Problem fixed. Fortunately my 2002 2520DV has access to this.
 

chas650r

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so it sounds removal is something that should been done as preventative maintenance, correct?? if so thanks for the heads up ! it's on the list. it is the small fitting between the elbow and the fuel line correct?
 

John_Madison CT

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so it sounds removal is something that should been done as preventative maintenance, correct?? if so thanks for the heads up ! it's on the list. it is the small fitting between the elbow and the fuel line correct?


Yes, right at the tank. Usually aluminum.
 

Mpellet

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so it sounds removal is something that should been done as preventative maintenance, correct?? if so thanks for the heads up ! it's on the list. it is the small fitting between the elbow and the fuel line correct?
That is the correct location and description of the anti siphon, yes. As to removing the anti siphon being “preventative maintenance” I think that’s debatable. Yes there is a possibility of an anti siphon sticking or getting clogged but there is also the possibility of the anti siphon doing what it’s supposed to do and preventing a significant fuel spill in the event of some sort of downstream hose failure.

You can replace the anti siphon with an identical looking and sized thread in nipple, minus the anti siphon internals and it will work fine. A fuel siphoning situation is unlikely and in theory the water separator should be above the tank but depending upon what boat, the fuel tank on Parker’s can sit in that coffin, under the deck up off the actual bottom of the hull and depending upon fuel hose routing and location of the water separator, there could be a gravity situation, albeit unlikely but possible for the right failure to create a fuel siphoning situation.

I know that I have the tools and ability to remove and replace the anti siphon valve while on the water should I suspect an issue with it and keep a spare nipple on board, minus the anti siphon capability for emergency use, however with everything running normally, I choose to keep the anti siphon valve in the fuel system for the unlikely event when I need it to function as designed.

I’m not preaching and I have thought about removing the anti siphon preemptively but for reasons stated above, I choose to retain it in my system.
 

tomc585

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Mine had failed in the open position which would go undetected. I had no issues just inspected it while changing fuel lines. Just a piece of cork and an aluminum shaving.
 

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chas650r

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Mpellet, thanks for the function description. having the necessary items to remove it at sea seems prudent . maybe I will inspect it both to clean it and to know I can get it apart if needed at sea. I have found some fuel fittings firmly gooped together in the past. fuel flow problems are usually simple but crippling.
 

pelagic2530

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That is the correct location and description of the anti siphon, yes. As to removing the anti siphon being “preventative maintenance” I think that’s debatable. Yes there is a possibility of an anti siphon sticking or getting clogged but there is also the possibility of the anti siphon doing what it’s supposed to do and preventing a significant fuel spill in the event of some sort of downstream hose failure.

You can replace the anti siphon with an identical looking and sized thread in nipple, minus the anti siphon internals and it will work fine. A fuel siphoning situation is unlikely and in theory the water separator should be above the tank but depending upon what boat, the fuel tank on Parker’s can sit in that coffin, under the deck up off the actual bottom of the hull and depending upon fuel hose routing and location of the water separator, there could be a gravity situation, albeit unlikely but possible for the right failure to create a fuel siphoning situation.

I know that I have the tools and ability to remove and replace the anti siphon valve while on the water should I suspect an issue with it and keep a spare nipple on board, minus the anti siphon capability for emergency use, however with everything running normally, I choose to keep the anti siphon valve in the fuel system for the unlikely event when I need it to function as designed.

I’m not preaching and I have thought about removing the anti siphon preemptively but for reasons stated above, I choose to retain it in my system.
Adding to Mpellet's very correct description, the anti-siphon valve is an ABYC requirement. In the (albeit very unlikely) situation that a fuel line fails and causes damage or a loss, and can be traced back to removal of the anti-siphon device, your insurance company may be able to use that as a reason to reduce/refuse payout.

Having the tools and know-how to replace, clean, or bypass the ASD in an emergency situation seems like the prudent way to go.
 

ReelDeal

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So I know you are all dying to find out what happened so here ya go!

access to the fuel pickups and sending unit is under my bait tank. Removing the tank was all that was needed to resolve the issue. The anti siphon valve was completely blocked. Replaced and good as new. I appreciate all the responses.
Brett
 
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