Quantcast

Trailer vs slip/mooring

Classic Parker

Help Support Classic Parker:

Porkchunker

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 24, 2006
Messages
2,377
Reaction score
1
Location
Solomons Island, MD
Saw the post concerning slip vs mooring, and decided to ask a similar question. Are you on a trailer or in a slip/on a mooring? Why? Would you change?

I was up in Cape St. Claire (near Annapolis) at Fairwinds Marina, and keeping her there on a trailer with full ramp privileges and 24 hr access (with guarantee to not be blocked in by winterized boats, so I could come and go), was approaching $1,700 a year. :( :( :(

Was offered a deal I couldn't refuse...came to the top of the list at the Navy facility, and it costs me a grand total of $235 a year. :D :D :D

Driving time is about 70-90 minutes one way (vice 40-50 minutes to Fairwinds), but savings is worth it. Oh yes...the fishing is better in Mid-Bay. :D :D :D

I decided to stay on the trailer because of costs, I didn't want to mess with bottom paint, and I wanted to be mobile to chase the fish up/down the Ches. Bay, and possibly off of VA Beach, NC, and the OBX. When on a trailer, it also allows me to keep a full cover on her when not in use. Because of the full cover, the topsides have been protected from the UV, and looks like the day I took delivery of her.

I would like the convenience of being in a slip, but at this point in my life, I'll stay on the trailer. When I get older and get tired of launching/recovering, I'll probably go into a slip (actually on a lift if given the opportunity).

BTW, a 25' Parker can be launched/recovered from a trailer by one person fairly easily. Just have to have your ducks lined up. I have an electric winch on the trailer and those tall PVC guide poles which help with the recovery. An no...I don't powerload.
 

Megabyte

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 16, 2006
Messages
10,544
Reaction score
1
Location
Lewes, DE
When I bought my Parker, she was living on a trailer under an oak tree.
(Fairwinds Marina, same place as Porkchunker used to keep his 2510)



In my case, selling the trailer and using the proceeds to repair and upgrade the boat made more sense than spending an additional $35k for a proper tow vehicle, and then there was still the issue of where to store the boat on a trailer. My HOA does not allow boats to be stored in the community. :(
Besides, that trailer was everything that I didn't like... it was a galvenized, roller trailer with drum brakes, so selling it wasn't a difficult thing to do.

I cleaned, repaired, and upgraded her motor and safety systems, bottom painted her, then put her in a slip that is only a mile from my home.



Having her in the water and so close to home, means that I can be under way quickly, and that means that I get tp use her more often.

That's my story... :D
 

B-Faithful

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 23, 2006
Messages
1,887
Reaction score
0
Location
Annapolis, MD
I have a trailer that sits in the parking lot of my marina. I love having the boat wet slipped where all I have to do is untie and go.
 

rangerdog

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 23, 2006
Messages
644
Reaction score
0
Location
Isle of Palms, SC/Fairfax, VA
I just moved to a wet slip this year. Convenient 1 hour drive and not having to tow her is a money saver on gas and my nerves. I have the trailer at home and will probably put her on it in November for a couple of CBBT trips in Dec.
 

Mokee

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 21, 2006
Messages
179
Reaction score
0
Location
Chicago Area
My BIL and I are trailer boaters. Our 2120 DVSC is either in the water, or on the trailer. She divides time between upstate SC and summer in the Chicago area. We wanted something for the ICW, Great Lakes and inland waterways in between. The boat's manageable for one person to trailer, splash and recover.

We went thru the factory a couple years back and were really impressed at how Parkers are built - rugged, no frills and easily modified. BIL put in an extra berth and storage. We later added a genny, small appliances, heater and A/C.

Wet - we spend nights on the hook whenever possible. Dry - we use her like an RV when on the road. I've spent several weeks on her at a time.

I don't anticipate a wet slip in the future, but dry stacking might be a possibility.
 

TOPFROG

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 17, 2006
Messages
45
Reaction score
0
Location
Charlottesville, VA
This old man's plans are to use the trailer to move the boat to the water in spring and move the boat to house in dead of winter (for me, into the water late March / early April and out late Dec to mid January)....On a boat lift in between.
As an aside.....I have found the DMV laws here in VA require a special hauling permit for our 25' pilothouse 9'6" wide "road hogs" :cry: Talked with DMV and was told $12 one way and must be "dated and routes to be driven defined" - also the WIDE LOAD signs front and back.... Numerous "and if you don't have a permit and we bust you - it gets UGLY" :shock: threats. Me, I think it's just one more tax collection effort - I postulated that there must be some sort of book I must study and a test to take in order to get the permit......"Nope, just bring your wallet" or apply online at www.DMVNOW.com......
Ain't life swell :lol:
 

Porkchunker

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 24, 2006
Messages
2,377
Reaction score
1
Location
Solomons Island, MD
Yea, I know the VA permit system well. Have used it the last three years going from the Annapolis, MD area to the CBBT and back in Dec.

They are not hard to obtain...can be done over the internet in a few minutes, and they e-mail you a notification to go download them from their site when they've completed processing the request. You don't actually have to travel on the date of the permit, but must be in a 5 or 7 day window (if I remember correctly). Yes, you have to have the signs front and back, and for the city of Norfolk, you have to have the little yellow flashing light on the tow vehicle. I sign-up and flash-up at home and leave them on for the duration of the trip through MD, VA, and Norfolk to Little Creek Naval Amphib Base...same on the return trip.

Once you get by the initial $50 investement for signs and light, it is not too bad...much more cost effective than driving the boat 120 NM down through the Bay at 9.5 gph. :D :D :D Is it a pain...yes...but the mobility of a great fishing machine big enough to take the rough water at the CBBT makes it worth while.

Maybe I can find a pic of Tina's Diamond all rigged for travel.
 
Top