Vertical windlass on a 2120?

Classic Parker

Help Support Classic Parker:

Cheapie408

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 27, 2021
Messages
120
Reaction score
19
All the installation I've seen has been a horizontal windlass. Can I fit a Vertical Pro Fish v700 on a 2120?
 

Andy

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2017
Messages
506
Reaction score
182
Location
Pungo Creek, NC
All the installation I've seen has been a horizontal windlass. Can I fit a Vertical Pro Fish v700 on a 2120?
If you mount the V700 where most folks mount the horizontal models, (on the aft end of the pulpit, between the two bow cleats), I don't believe there is sufficient space forward in the anchor locker, for the motor; this, because the bow-angle leaves less space in the forward part of the locker. (With vertical windlasses, the motor is not 'self-contained' like on the horizontal models; the motor hangs under the unit; in the rode-locker). I suppose if you really prefer a horizontal model (as there are some advantages, like more 'bite'), and wanted to 're-build/remodel' some of the forward deck, and you mounted the V700 further aft where the anchor locker hatch is, and where the locker is 'taller', then there would be more space for the motor. The anchor lockers are not huge to begin with, and taking up space with the motor hanging there might be the reason a lot of folks use the horizontal windlasses. (another option would be the deck-mounted windlasses where everything is stored on deck like on a large hose-reel. I've seen a number of Parkers with that set-up).
1614800734554.png
 
Last edited:

Cheapie408

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 27, 2021
Messages
120
Reaction score
19
I think I saw someone doing what you are referring to. A box was built to sit over the anchor locker which in turn raised the windlass allowing the proper fall height. The drum style windlass would look horrendous on a small boat. LOL I think I'll look into getting horizontal one. I don't anchor in more than 60ft of water and don't see myself doing so anytime soon. Will consider a trolling motor with an anchor lock feature if I find myself needing to stay at one place in deeper waters.
 

Andy

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2017
Messages
506
Reaction score
182
Location
Pungo Creek, NC
I think I saw someone doing what you are referring to. A box was built to sit over the anchor locker which in turn raised the windlass allowing the proper fall height. The drum style windlass would look horrendous on a small boat. LOL I think I'll look into getting horizontal one. I don't anchor in more than 60ft of water and don't see myself doing so anytime soon. Will consider a trolling motor with an anchor lock feature if I find myself needing to stay at one place in deeper waters.
I agree the drum-styles look 'different',... but sometimes the beauty is in the functionality!
I too seldom need to anchor in deep water, which is why I use our horizontal, Lewmar Profish 700 in the 'power-down' mode, and not the 'free-fall' mode.
 
Last edited:

Cheapie408

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 27, 2021
Messages
120
Reaction score
19
Please elaborate on why you don't use freefall? Seems everyone wants to have freefall but not many windlass over this.
 

Andy

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2017
Messages
506
Reaction score
182
Location
Pungo Creek, NC
Please elaborate on why you don't use freefall? Seems everyone wants to have freefall but not many windlass over this.
Like I mentioned, I usually anchor in shallow water. 5'-10' is common; occasionally 15'-25', and also occasionally in 3'-5'. 'Power-down' gives me control, to let out the right amount of rode as needed, deploying it in small 'bursts' as I'm backing down the boat. If using 'Free-fall' it quickly dumps the chain and rode in a potential 'birds-nest', in a pile on top of the anchor. (again, I'm talking about shallow-water anchoring). Free-fall is great when you are anchoring in deep water, (60'? 75'? 100'?, 150'?) and want the anchor to drop-where-you-want it to be, very quickly; mostly because you want to be/stay close to a specific 'fishing spot'. That is seldom the case for me. Most of my boating is in the shallow waters of eastern NC. (Pamlico Sound. Pungo and Pamlico River. Albemarle Sound). 'Power-down' works best in these shallow conditions. (With the Lewmar Profish 700, even 'power-down' is very fast! VERY fast!. I have to just bump the switch on-off-on-off as I'm using it).
In the past when we had larger cruising boats, we anchored in countless places from the Chesapeake Bay to South Carolina. Back then we often anchored, mostly over-night and for multiple days, and in deeper waters; sometimes not by choice. I didn't have a windlass on those boats, but I was younger and stronger back then!).
 
Last edited:

Cheapie408

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 27, 2021
Messages
120
Reaction score
19
Makes sense, looks like I should still find one with free fall so I can have it as an option in the deeper channels.
 

Andy

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2017
Messages
506
Reaction score
182
Location
Pungo Creek, NC
Makes sense, looks like I should still find one with free fall so I can have it as an option in the deeper channels.
Yes, I totally agree; get one that gives you both options. It's a simple procedure to switch the Lewmar Profish from Free-Fall to Power-Down. The Lewmar ProFish 700 are commonly seen on Parkers and a lot of other similar-sized boats; our Parker had one on it when I bought it. It was new to me, but I loved seeing that the previous owner had already installed one! (I also like it, well, because it is 'shiny-S/S' , and it looks good!). I 'single-hand' the boat a lot. And after I 'fixed' an anchor-roller problem, I find it is super-convenient to not have to run to the bow every time I'm anchoring; I can do it all from the safety of the pilothouse; which also comes in handy when retrieving the anchor, single-handed, in adverse conditions. It helps makes our time on the boat safer, convenient and just plain more fun!
 
Last edited:

sydngoose

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 14, 2011
Messages
696
Reaction score
115
Location
Ortega river, Jacksonville, Fl
You will want the Lewmar profish 700 on your 2120. The 1000 series is over kill.

This is what I mounted on my 2120 nearly 8 years ago.
This is what Parker mounted in my 2320.
Yes, free fall is what you want. Why wouldn’t you??
Lewmar recommends installing so that the chain and rode fall directly down with no slope.
I actually spent a tremendous amount of time and energy building a windlass pad so it does drop straight down with the 2120. It was very time consuming but turned out great. Also, not once in ownership did I have a cobble/ hobble or jam.

Now, on my 2320, Parker mounted it aft on the pulpit and the rode does drop down with a slope into the anchor locker. So far, I have had no jams/hobbles with the rode.

I will say that I have a bow mounted trolling motor with GPS spot lock, so I don't anchor anymore unless dropping an anchor to explore a beach line or island. But, that is in less than 10 feet of water where I am dropping anchor and using the windlass to retract the rode.

On my 2120:


















 
Last edited:

Cheapie408

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 27, 2021
Messages
120
Reaction score
19
I like the idea of having the windlass on the pullpit, I think it looks better. I think that would be how I'd install it. I actually found your original post of that build, but it seems you're the only few that did this, everyone put it aft of the pullpit. Unless there's absolute benefit and worth the effort I'd prefer not to do it, but in this case it doesn't seem to be.
 

Andy

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2017
Messages
506
Reaction score
182
Location
Pungo Creek, NC
You will want the Lewmar profish 700 on your 2120. The 1000 series is over kill.

This is what I mounted on my 2120 nearly 8 years ago.
This is what Parker mounted in my 2320.
Yes, free fall is what you want. Why wouldn’t you??
Lewmar recommends installing so that the chain and rode fall directly down with no slope.
I actually spent a tremendous amount of time and energy building a windlass pad so it does drop straight down with the 2120. It was very time consuming but turned out great. Also, not once in ownership did I have a cobble/ hobble or jam.

Now, on my 2320, Parker mounted it aft on the pulpit and the rode does drop down with a slope into the anchor locker. So far, I have had no jams/hobbles with the rode.

I will say that I have a bow mounted trolling motor with GPS spot lock, so I don't anchor anymore unless dropping an anchor to explore a beach line or island. But, that is in less than 10 feet of water where I am dropping anchor and using the windlass to retract the rode.

On my 2120:


















Hi Syndngoose, Nice photos, thank you for re-posting! I explained earlier why Free-Fall is not useful for shallow-water anchoring, but I agree it is nice to have the option for both Free-fall and Power Down.... Looking at the photos you sent, I'm thinking that you may have found the solution to one of the three major design flaws that I don't like about my Parker pilothouse.; that being the insanity of allowing water to get into the anchor-rode locker, then channeling it all the way, through the bilges, through pipe, then to the aft bilge, constantly soaking everything on its way! (a constant maintenance issue. and mold/mildew contributor).
A lot of this water (mostly rain water) gets in through the rode/anchor compartment lid on the forward deck. (It looks like you may have solved that issue, by sealing it up?)... The other big water-entry-hole, is the hole under the windlass itself, where the rode goes through the deck, into then rode locker.... After you completed your project, did you find that it reduced? prevented? the amount of water intrusion. Water that always ends up in the aft bilge compartment...
 

Cheapie408

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 27, 2021
Messages
120
Reaction score
19
So the water goes from anchor locker to the bilge? WTH? They couldn't drain it to the front like normal boats do?
 

Andy

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2017
Messages
506
Reaction score
182
Location
Pungo Creek, NC
So the water goes from anchor locker to the bilge? WTH? They couldn't drain it to the front like normal boats do?
That's right! WTH! All my past boats had drains directly from the anchor locker, through the hull, directly drained to the outside of the boat. I had dry bilges! In our Parker, the water is not just drained into the bilge, but into the first bilge under the cuddy cabin, then drained through a PVC pipe into the next bilge-area under the pilothouse, then through another pipe into the bilge under the fuel tank into the far aft bilge, creating mold, mildew and yuck that needs constant cleaning. The aft bilge pump and switch is mounted on a 'block' so it is not activated until the aft bilge is deep in water. And when/if it does activate, it still will leave (if I let it) 3-4 gallons of water sloshing around the aft bilge, where the batteries are located along with the fuel filter, electrical components, and other items/components. (believe me, I constantly pump/sponge/scoop and towel-dry my bilges EVERY week! to prevent this... I have video and photos to prove that; I just should NOT have to spend my time doing such)...
My last boat had a large anchor-rode locker. I could physically crawl INTO the rode locker. (Yes I could, and have the photos to prove it☺). With the Parker, my hopes are to find a way to first raise the 'floor' of the anchor locker (If the floor is not raised, a drain hole from the bottom of the anchor locker, would bring water IN, not out!, and then to drill/install a hole, with a tube, and a clam-shell-vent, to finally be able to drain the water out of the anchor locker as soon as it comes in..... This may not be a big issue to someone who stores their boat in their garage, a barn, an enclosed dry-stack, under a shelter or similar location. But it is a big deal to a boat that is out in the weather 24/7.
 

Cheapie408

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 27, 2021
Messages
120
Reaction score
19
That sounds like a big pile of BS of parker. I too store my boat outside. Knowing that I was getting a boat between 22-24ft I bought a new cover long before I even purchased the boat. Hopefully this remedy the rain issues but it still doesn't solve it when you're pulling up the wet rode. Is it remotely possible to add drain tubes and drill through the bow somehow?
 

Andy

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2017
Messages
506
Reaction score
182
Location
Pungo Creek, NC
That sounds like a big pile of BS of parker. I too store my boat outside. Knowing that I was getting a boat between 22-24ft I bought a new cover long before I even purchased the boat. Hopefully this remedy the rain issues but it still doesn't solve it when you're pulling up the wet rode. Is it remotely possible to add drain tubes and drill through the bow somehow?
It would not be a good idea to just drill/add a drain tube, at least not on a 2013 2520 XLD in its present/original condition. If you drilled/installed a drain hole at the bottom of the rode-locker, (where it would need to be), it would be below the waterline of the boat, and would flood/sink the boat. To make it work, it would be necessary to first raise the 'floor' of the anchor rode locker about 5-6 inches. And by doing so, sealing the hole that presently drains the water into the bilges. There are a lot of very talented people on CP that have extensive fiberglass repair and fiberglass fabrication skills. I'm not one of them! ☺But I do have some experience with West System epoxy. I still have about a gallon of epoxy, hardener, and 3-4 containers of micro balloons and fillers that I have used on previous re-builds and repairs that I've done over the years. But I have also made some mistakes that I'm not willing to chance on the Parker... I was hoping some of the CP fiberglass-gurus have had this issue, and have come up with a solution. This is not the first time this subject has come up CP.
 
Last edited:

sydngoose

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 14, 2011
Messages
696
Reaction score
115
Location
Ortega river, Jacksonville, Fl
I like the idea of having the windlass on the pullpit, I think it looks better. I think that would be how I'd install it. I actually found your original post of that build, but it seems you're the only few that did this, everyone put it aft of the pullpit. Unless there's absolute benefit and worth the effort I'd prefer not to do it, but in this case it doesn't seem to be.
agree with you: I was more of a purist back then: If Lewmar stated it needed a direct fall, I was going to build it. However, agreed. The aft Pulpit mounted windlass works just fine, and I will not change it on my 2320.

On my 2120, no I never got water in the anchor locker that mattered.
Fishing, the water that came into that locker was negligible. She lived on a trailer, and I had a 20' X52' pole barn built to store her under cover, so she never got the rain water.

The anchor locker filling w/ water and draining to the bilge just wasn't a problem for me on the 2120.

It's not a problem for me on the 2320 as Parker finally drained the anchor locker overboard starting in 2018 w/ the new design.
 

gregd123

Member
Joined
Jun 26, 2020
Messages
24
Reaction score
6
If you store a lot of chain and rope like I do (60 feet of chain and 500 feet of rope) on my 2520, you are not going to want to reduce the amount of space in your locker. It is very tight as it is. If you are anchoring overnight, you generally want a minimum of 3x - 5x the depth (Coast Guard recommends 7x) of rode out depending on conditions. I would keep that in mind when determining how much rode you want to keep on your boat and consequently how much storage space you need.

Also, I have found that my Lewmar, mounted by the previous owner between the cleats like most, drops the rode on the forward slope of the locker and ends up piling up and blocking the entrance when there is a decent amount out. I will eventually move the drop point back, just haven't got around to it. If you are only doing shallow anchoring, this would not be as much of a concern. I constantly have to contort my arm up into the locker to pull down the rope and chain when anchoring in water greater than 20 or 30 feet.
 

pelagic2530

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Joined
Nov 17, 2006
Messages
1,253
Reaction score
120
Location
Indian River, DE / Norfolk, VA
Another thing to consider, especially if you're like GregD and need a lot of anchor rode, is using a 8-plait rode as opposed to 3-strand. It's a lot more flexible and will lay in the locker better than three strand.

I have 600' of 3-strand in my anchor locker (older Good windlass won't accept 8-plait) and it's a nightmare. Pretty much need someone to be up in the bow coiling up the rode as it comes in to make sure it'll all fit. Not a good way of doing business AT ALL, but it's tough to justify buying another one while this one works.
 

Cheapie408

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 27, 2021
Messages
120
Reaction score
19
I'll be having 150-200 ft. I've actually never had more than 100 feet of rode and 15ft of chains on my boat in the past and never found the need to "yet". I can see where it can become useful if my engine give out in deeper waters having the extra length would mean I'll be able to stop the boat from drifting. Other than that I don't do any anchor fishing over 60ft
 

pelagic2530

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Joined
Nov 17, 2006
Messages
1,253
Reaction score
120
Location
Indian River, DE / Norfolk, VA
I'll be having 150-200 ft. I've actually never had more than 100 feet of rode and 15ft of chains on my boat in the past and never found the need to "yet". I can see where it can become useful if my engine give out in deeper waters having the extra length would mean I'll be able to stop the boat from drifting. Other than that I don't do any anchor fishing over 60ft
Keep in mind that 180' is the minimum recommended scope for 60' of water. I'm not sure I'd rely on 3:1 scope in any sort of weather conditions. A little bit more scope is a nice bit of insurance if you need it; if your engine goes out you can save yourself a bit of time and money on the tow by being able to anchor rather than possibly drift further offshore while waiting for the tow. It also gives you the ability to have an extra long rode in a bad situation (such as needing to hold off a lee shore after an engine failure- you'll want all the holding power you can get).

Another thing that isn't talked about a lot is that your anchor rode is probably the best thing you'll have on your boat to serve as an emergency tow line, either for you to tow someone or for them to tow you. You should definitely never PLAN on using that, but in a bad situation, having a long length of undersized line in tow is a lot better than having too short a length, and decreases the chance of it parting significantly. Remember too that if you need it to tow someone else, and it's going through a windlass, you'll eat up about 25' of length bringing it back to the cockpit and securing it on a stern cleat.

Longer anchor rode is (relatively) cheap insurance; I always try to have as much on hand as I can reasonably fit.
 

Latest posts

Top