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Parker 28 100+ miles offshore?

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sailphish

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Currently have a 25SE and am considering an upgrade to a 2810/2820. We fish the 25SE regularly from 25-40 miles out, and have been past 50 a few times on very flat days. There are some very good fishing grounds near me in the 70-120 mile range that I just don't feel comfortable doing in my mod-v, single engine boat. Clearly the 28 seems adequate for most offshore fishing, but what about regular trips 100+ miles out in the Gulf of Mexico, 50-75 miles out in the Atlantic, offshore grounds out of the Bahamas? Assuming you aren't dumb about the weather (but also not wanting to have to wait for that very rare absolutely perfect weather window) and have all safety gear, how do you think it would do for this purpose?

It came up recently when someone was commenting on my 25SE that they really liked the size, but said it is "more of a big little boat, as opposed to a little big boat." This got me thinking about the 28 Parker, which essentially has the same freeboard and configurations as my 25 (although a little more deadrise). While seemingly big for its size compared to a lot of production boats, the 28 seems small next to something like the 29 Albemarle (which has 2X the pricetag) or Grady White Marlin 300.

At the present, I have no intention on going any bigger than the Parker 28. For inshore fishing the 25SE is better, and for nearshore stuff within 30 miles or so it is probably a wash. For WAY offshore, a 40+ft sportfish is going to be the way to go, but that simply isn't in the cards right now. I guess I am concerned that the 28 is going to be more hassle inshore, but still feel a bit inadequate for the real offshore work.

Any thoughts on this? Should I upgrade, or just be happy with my current ride and maybe take a few offshore charters each year to satisfy that bug?
 

knotflying

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I don't think distance is as important as sea conditions related to boat. With any long distance trip I would want to make sure I had a good weather window with good predictions on either side of my trip and as close as possible to my trip. I have a 25 Parker and a 27 Ranger Tug. I have done the Bahamas with the Tug. and I would have no hesitation of doing it with the Parker. Absolutely no northerly wind component is required when crossing the gulf stream in any boat like ours.
 

plumcrazy

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Currently have a 25SE and am considering an upgrade to a 2810/2820. We fish the 25SE regularly from 25-40 miles out, and have been past 50 a few times on very flat days. There are some very good fishing grounds near me in the 70-120 mile range that I just don't feel comfortable doing in my mod-v, single engine boat. Clearly the 28 seems adequate for most offshore fishing, but what about regular trips 100+ miles out in the Gulf of Mexico, 50-75 miles out in the Atlantic, offshore grounds out of the Bahamas? Assuming you aren't dumb about the weather (but also not wanting to have to wait for that very rare absolutely perfect weather window) and have all safety gear, how do you think it would do for this purpose?

It came up recently when someone was commenting on my 25SE that they really liked the size, but said it is "more of a big little boat, as opposed to a little big boat." This got me thinking about the 28 Parker, which essentially has the same freeboard and configurations as my 25 (although a little more deadrise). While seemingly big for its size compared to a lot of production boats, the 28 seems small next to something like the 29 Albemarle (which has 2X the pricetag) or Grady White Marlin 300.

At the present, I have no intention on going any bigger than the Parker 28. For inshore fishing the 25SE is better, and for nearshore stuff within 30 miles or so it is probably a wash. For WAY offshore, a 40+ft sportfish is going to be the way to go, but that simply isn't in the cards right now. I guess I am concerned that the 28 is going to be more hassle inshore, but still feel a bit inadequate for the real offshore work.

Any thoughts on this? Should I upgrade, or just be happy with my current ride and maybe take a few offshore charters each year to satisfy that bug?
I have a 2013 2820xld w/twin Yamaha 250s. the boat is a beast. i take it 70 to 80 miles off shore with no issues, even in some not so perfect conditions. It really comes down to fuel burn and reserve. I also fish inshore in bays and estuaries. The 28 is not an issue just get the second station you'll never regret it.
 

GoodChance

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Short answer - Yes

I could post dozen of pictures of a 23 DVCC and a 2801 taken 100+ miles offshore from Clearwater.

The boat can easily do the trip. The better question is the person behind the spinny-round thing. Does he (she) have the knowledge of boat operation, weather systems, boat electrical systems, radar operations, first aid, hydraulics, mechanical aptitude, etc to run the boat and keep everyone safe when help is 100 miles away?
 

Swatski

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I would make sure to get the DV hull if planning on going offshore all the time. The difference is not subtle.

--
 

Antidote

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I go to the Gulf Stream from Hilton Head Island in my 2520 XLD with twin 200s as often as I can. My trip totals are typically well over 200 miles for the day.
 

djam

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Different ocean, but I take my 2320 80-90 miles out all the time. The most I've done is 110 out, with a little extra gas just in case. It is pretty typical to do a 180-200 mile trip. My last trip was 258 miles for the day. 28 would be a dream for us, except you know, CA gas is 4.25/gal on the water.
 

2801 Parker

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Been to the Bahamas several times in my 2801 CC. Twin Suzuki 250, 300 gal. of fuel and an EPIRB.
 
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I have a 2018 2510 XLD with twin 250's (for safety not for speed!). On decent days, I run 65 NM miles (sometimes a little further) to the Gulf Stream out of Southport NC. The boat has no problem making that run, a good 200 miles round trip with trolling. I typically burn 100 gal. of gas and have about 60 usable in reserve.

On a good day, I can cruse at 30 Knotts. Most days, I have to run about 25.

I would have no problem running further if the fish were there. Not sure a 28' is going to make a whole lot of difference for you. I think the deep "V" is probably where you would gain the most improvement.

Also, when I set up the boat I went for all the safety equipment I thought would be helpful for long offshore runs: Twin 250's (a must for safety), doppler radar, water activated epirb with permanent mount, 2 VHF's with digital antennas, offshore life jackets, 6 person life raft, flare kit, first aid kit, and ditch bag with additional manual epirb as back up, handheld VHF with GPS, flares, first aid kit, strobe lites for each life jacket, waterproof flashlight, spare batteries for everything in vacuum sealed bags, tether lines to keep us all attached in the water, etc. etc. etc. (sure I forgot some things).

My point is, running that far offshore is fine if you have all the necessary equipment in the event something drastic goes wrong. Deep "V", twins, EPIRB, and good (well stocked) ditch bag, and life raft to me are all a must. If you are 80-100 miles offshore and a thru hull breaks causing your boat to go down, you don't have hours to get help. If the boat goes down, you'll be happy to give a rescue boat your bank account to save you. So, spending the dollars on something you may never use, will be well spent if you every do need it. Sorry for the rant, just my $.02 on the topic.
 

edgarop

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I have a 2320 and we do 70 to 80 miles out on a regular basis. A few weeks back we went out to cortez bank off southern california to fish for bluefin, not a problem at all. Took a 50 gallon ATL bladder and made it back with 60 gallons to spare and 6 bluefin on the deck. Just watch the weather and make sure your boat maintenance is in tip top shape.
 

MURPH

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I have a 2320 and we do 70 to 80 miles out on a regular basis. A few weeks back we went out to cortez bank off southern california to fish for bluefin, not a problem at all. Took a 50 gallon ATL bladder and made it back with 60 gallons to spare and 6 bluefin on the deck. Just watch the weather and make sure your boat maintenance is in tip top shape.
 

MURPH

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25/28. It’s all about the weather. Not to mention experience , safety gear ect
 

A-K

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Rule of 1/3.

1/3 of a tank to get to fishing grounds.

1/3 of a tank to get home.

1/3 reserve just in case.

When the seas kick up fuel burn gets worse. Don’t get caught.
 

Pescadorrr

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Like everyone is saying... it’s weather and gas. We got a guy here in SoCal that takes a handmade 19’ skiff with a tiller 90 hp outboard 100+ miles offshore to Cortez and Tanner Banks. Guys with Parkers of most any size go wherever they need to go.
 

Pescadorrr

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Now if you want a better ride that’s a different story. Steiger, Radon, Jones Brothers, World Cat, Farrallon are all way better riding boats in my opinion.
 

whitey

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Pick you weather, had a 2005 2520xl took to the hudson canyon, 100 square off the edge numerous occasions. Took to the fish Tails off of Montauk 106 miles all trips out of Moriches New York. on one occasion we got caught at the Texas tower the wind came early out of the NW and blew 40 with guests.
riding the troughs home took water over top a few time slow trip home she held her own. we made back safe and dry. Not saying you take out in bad, but they are strong boats and THEY CAN HANDLE it. SHE will bring you home safe. KEY IS PICK YOUR WEATHER. PS POWERED BY A 225.
 

CGSailor

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Spent a fair amount of my life cleaning up after situations like that, don't ever want to be one of them.
 

Mpellet

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Weather, weather, weather say it a few more times. There are days when 28 is plenty of boat to be a 100 off, other days when 5 miles is too far for 40 foot boat.

Then there is owner/operator.

What can you fix and have spares for?

Any plan for a steering failur?

How about something simple like a plastic bowl falling off the bottom of a fuel/water separator?

Dead batteries?

Bad cut for someone on the boat?

Again starting and ending with WEATHER, a Parker 28 is enough boat to head a 100 off in the right weather window but there are a lot more things to think then just the boat.......
 

Pescadorrr

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I saw a guy and a girl on jet skis out past San Clemente on a trip (probably 70 miles out).
Now that is impressive. We saw a 15’ whaler get capsized once at Pyramid by a rogue wave.
 
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