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Pilothouse Floor Covering Trial

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cbigma

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A couple of months ago there was a thread about slippery floors in the General Forum.
HERE

I've been on the hunt ever since, and have settled on this year's "Cabin Floor Material Abuse" candidate.
I think Porkchunker is using a material that sounds like it might be a close relative of this material, but he is using 18" squares.

The material is called "Anti-Fatigue Foam Flooring", made by Teamproducts. I have seen several versions of this product in assorted Home Improvement and
Warehouse stores such as Home Depot, Lowes, Costco and BJ's. Some versions are multicolored squares for use in playpens and kids
gyms, while others are more industrial looking.

I opted to leave Sesame Street at the dock and bought an "industrial" looking diamond-plate version at BJ's warehouse for about $18.

There was a warning on the package that said "This foam may discolor hardwood floors". I was a little puzzled why someone would cover
up nice hardwood floors with diamond-plate foam, but maybe to keep free weights from messing up the wood or something.



I didn't use any adhesive or tape backing to install them, just press in place and trim where necessary. The 2X2 squares interlock,
and make it easier to trim around the helm seat pedastal, and other cabin contours than it ever was with a single piece of carpeting. Only time
will tell if they hold up as well as a single piece O'indoor/outdoor.




They feel pretty spongy underfoot, and should be comfy in barefeet. Not sure how they will stand up to twisting, turning, etc. They don't absorb water so they should dry out pretty quickly without that pleasant "Eau de Musty August Cabin Rug" ambience. :wink:




We'll give it a try for a few weeks and see how they fare, and watch for discoloration.
I like the idea that I can flip up the square where the forward bilge deckplate is. (I may be keeping an eye on that one for awhile) :roll:



The other type of flooring I considered was that heavy duty hard-rubber waffle-type matting that comes in squares. That stuff is really
heavy, and not-so-nice on the bare feet.

John
 

Sow&Pigs

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I'm thinking of laying a teak and holly floor. Not exactly easy, but once down it should look great. For those interested in doing the same (or in contemplating the insanity...) check out this link at Worldpanel:

http://www.worldpanel.com/Marineplywoodsspecialty.htm

They also have started selling rolls of teak and holly look-alike pvc flooring, which would be cheaper and easier to install. You simply cut a plywood underlayment, use it as a template for the pvc teak and holly, glue and screw the plywood to the cabin floor, and then cement the pvc teak and holly over it... At least that's the theory :shock:

Worth a look anyway.
 

cbigma

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TomS":3e1btggi said:
How hot do you think that black floor is going to get in the sun?

-- Tom
Tom,

My Pilothouse floor never really takes direct sun except for maybe a spot right near the open cabin door.

You can bet I'll be lookin' for that spot after the first dive when the water is still 45 degrees and I can't feel my toes! :shock:

Good point though,, what -is- the ideal cabin floor color? Hospital White or some easier to clean color like CocoaMat brown or Teak-and-Holly?

John
 

cbigma

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ParkerSal":22vhjx4e said:
Just the ticket for my back....
Sal..

Each package has 32 Sq Ft. It's not the heavy neoprene-type (like a thick mouse pad) foam, but more like a light PVA closed-cell foam. Think excercise mat, or sleeping bag mat or pool noodle.

Not sure how it would stand up to the "full battle" often seen in the cockpit when fish are on. Worth a look though. You might need the tough hard-rubber waffle-patterned stuff for the "fightin' cockpit".

John
 
A

Anonymous

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Cbigma,
After seeing this thread, I remembered a couple of years ago a freind gave me a bundle of the same mats, except these didn't have the diamond plate pattern. So, today while waiting for the boat to dry enough for bottom paint, I cut and put them down. I like the feel of them and should make a rough day alittle easier on the back. We'll see how they do after some days of battle and gore and fish blood and scales. I'm going to label the undersides in regards to placement, so when they have to be removed for washing replacing will be easy. They look pretty good too. Time will tell. :)
 

cbigma

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stonebuster":1ib9490e said:
I'm going to label the undersides in regards to placement, so when they have to be removed for washing replacing will be easy.
Great Idea!

I splashed yesterday, and so far it feels pretty good underfoot. But as you said...time will tell.......
 

JimG

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i thought this was a great idea but i couldnt find any foam with the manly diamond plate look so i got the sesame street stuff from Home Depot. it is gray if u turn it over. i put it in yesterday and havent had a chance to try it yet. will let u know if i have any problems with it.
 

Bald Eagle

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We installed the exact same material on our Parker. After one season we removed it and threw it away.
With all those little crevices were a real pain to keep clean, and any moisture or liquid spill required major disassembly and cleanup activity.
We eventually replaced all those squares with one single mat at the helm station.
 

cbigma

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Bald Eagle":ipfwflhh said:
With all those little crevices were a real pain to keep clean, and any moisture or liquid spill required major disassembly and cleanup activity.
Thanks for the "heads-up". Those were precisely the two reasons I went away from the single indoor-outdoor rubber-backed carpeting that I used for a couple of seasons; 1.) tough to keep clean and 2.) it never really dried out.

During the diving season, we have four pairs of wet feet going in and out of the cabin throughout the day. The indoor/outdoor carpeting was ok in the "non-skid" dept, but was always sorta like a wet dog...... never really dried out and smelled kinda funky in late July/August. :roll:

Looks like I may go through a couple more candidate materials before I find the "perfect" one. :? But we'll see, I'll give it a month or two.
 

cbigma

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JimG":26z097qt said:
it is gray if u turn it over.
DOH! I never thought of turning it over! :shock: I went to four more stores instead. :shock: Here's another fine ClassicParker lesson I learned!
 

Porkchunker

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cbigma":1yhiytit said:
A couple of months ago there was a thread about slippery floors in the General Forum.
HERE

I've been on the hunt ever since, and have settled on this year's "Cabin Floor Material Abuse" candidate.
I think Porkchunker is using a material that sounds like it might be a close relative of this material, but he is using 18" squares...
John
Yep...same stuff. I didn't cover the entire floor though, only the portion in front of the two helm seats and the walkway between them. Of course I have a 2510, so the four interlocking pieces are out of the sun, and mostly out of the rain/spray. At the end of the day, I lift them, and stack them vertically next to the helm seat so they dry and the floor doesn't mildew.

They really add some cushioning AND in the winter at the CBBT, they help keep the tootsies a bit warmer. :D :D :D

I never leave home with out it.
 

Porkchunker

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I opted to only cover those portions of the deck where people typically stand when we are underway. Normally the 4 pannels are up off the floor standing vertical so that the deck and the pads can dry out after cleaning.
 

Bruce

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I am new at having a Parker, so I have a couple of questions:

Wouldn't any kind of floor covering trap moisture underneath that promotes mildew and mold and produces the smells that come with them?

My floor doesn't feel slippery, but if it did, my deck shoes are non-marking and non-skid, look like cross trainers, and are comfortable. With a plain floor, all I have to do is hose down the pilothouse and let it dry.

Is it really better to put a floor covering down?
 

cbigma

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Hi Bruce:

Like many other aspects of life aboard a Parker, it's all a matter of personal preference, and how you use her. If you only carry adults, and no one participates in "water sports" then perhaps your pilothouse floor will always stay dry and the use of non-skid deck shoes will work great for you. :lol:

If on the other hand you have kids, dogs, divers, or lots of bare feet, you may find that the pilothouse floor gets wet and slippery. I'm lucky enough to have all of the above, and without some kind of floor covering, my pilothouse floor quickly becomes a skating rink. :shock:

IMHO the ideal floor covering would be a non-skid material that is easy on barefeet, doesn't absorb any water (i.e. dries quickly) and is easy to clean.

So far I have tried rubber-backed mats, indoor/outdoor carpet, and now this closed-cell foam (shown above). The mats and carpeting didn't dry out fast enough, and were tough to keep clean (since I don't keep a vacuum onboard). Maybe this foam mat material will be the solution, maybe not. Seems like other folks have already tried it, and it works for some, not for others.

It's clearly a matter of personal taste and what works best for how you use your Parker. There's hundreds of ways to enjoy life aboard a Parker, and the ideal floor covering will vary with your Parker Lifestyle.

John
 

cbigma

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Porkchunker":2mzgj98m said:
I opted to only cover those portions of the deck where people typically stand when we are underway. Normally the 4 pannels are up off the floor standing vertical so that the deck and the pads can dry out after cleaning.
Good approach,, only cover where "the action" is. This may be where I wind up after a season...
 

stonebuster

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Bruce, Covering the floor is not neccessary for most. I've rarely slipped on my wet floor, but I fish rather than dive so my floor usually doesn't get as wet as Cbigma's. It's just something we're experimenting with. There's no doubt in my mind I'll have to take it all out and clean it well after blood and guts day of fishing and let the mats dry before putting back in place. So far, I like the way it looks and feels but that may change when we go into battle fishing. We'll keep ya posted.
 

Porkchunker

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I didn't put it down to keep from slipping, but to cushion the shock one experiences from an all-day run & gun fishing trip. A side benefit is insulation during the cold Nov/Dec trips to the CBBT.

I pick mine up and stack it vertically after a trip, so that it dries out and doesn't allow mildew to form.
 

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