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Ethanol Concerns

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BoatGirl

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Hello All! Greetings from Parker!

I've been following the site and the information you are exchanging is great.

We have been receiving quite a few emails from owners concerning Ethanol. Since so many follow this site, I felt like it would be a great place to address the concerns.

Fuel manufacturers use many different component chemicals in varying quantities and mixtures to create what we all commonly refer to as Gasoline.

Ethanol, IE: Grain Alcohol, is only one of these components and can be found in most common pump Gasoline.

The Yamaha outboard motor and the Parker Marine installed fuel system (tank, hoses, fuel filter) is designed to use a gasoline fuel blended with a maximum of 10% Ethanol.

While most of the common blends of gasoline do not exceed more than 10% Ethanol content, we advise the consumer to ask before they pump, to assure themselves that the fuel they are using does not exceed the 10% maximum Ethanol content.

We recommend that fuel tanks be kept full when not in use and that fuel additives be used during the winter months.

Fuel filters should be 10 micron / 90 GPH spin on cartridges and replaced per the engine manufacturers specifications as stated in the operators manual.

Please do not hesitate to contact us at the factory if you should have any additional concerns. You can contact me directly at robin@parkerboats.net or our Engineering Dept at 252-728-5621.

Happy Boating!

Robin Parker
Marketing/Dealer Support
 

Megabyte

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Welcome aboard ClassicParker Robin, and thanks very much for the information on E10 fuel.

Lots of people have been concerned about this issue due to some of the wild stories 'out there'. :shock:
It's great to get the information from our builder-of-choice first hand.

Outboard motors are an expensive item these days, so we're all concerned, and want to protect that investment for many years to come.

Welcome again, and we hope you enjoy your visits here to CP. :)
 

cbigma

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Thanks for posting this info on the components of the Parker OEM fuel storage and delivery system. I think the reason this issue is such a hot one is that fuel is a “blind item”. We cannot see it before we buy it in the fuel dock tanks, we have no idea what the bottom of our on-board fuel tank looks like, and cannot tell if this new formula is causing it to change over time. Usually the only time we know we have a problem is when it is too late.

Having your information to rely on helps us eliminate potential issues with the Parker OEM systems and focus on the fuel itself.

Welcome to ClassicParker Robin. Your first post captures the spirit of this forum precisely. :D We are here to support each other by sharing information about our favorite boats!

We encourage you to continue to use ClassicParker as a convenient point of contact to address the largest assemblage of Parker People on the Planet.

John
 

Themis

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Thanks for the reply, Robin. The fact that you would do so unsolicited reinforces our decision to buy our Parkers.
 

Porkchunker

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Robin,

Welcome aboard, glad to have you here.

My dad still talks about our guided tour through the factory, and his talk with your father back in 2001. When we visited, dad didn't have a picture of the little wooden boat he built to show your father. I've loaded some onto a website. If you get a chance, show you father the Porkchunker at the link at the bottom of my signature.

I'm on the 5th season with Tina's Diamond, and still couldn't be happier with my decision to purchase a Parker.
 

salty sam

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Is it fairly easy to locate/change the engine fuel filter yourself? I also have a spin on filter in the bilge but it is not a Racor with a drain. Should I consider installing one? My dealer (Tristate) also recommended changing to a 10 micron filter ( I assume this is on the engine) and changing filters every 50 hours. Unless I can do this myself it will be extremely inconvenient as my dealer is not nearby. Appreciate any info. Thanks.
John
 

Megabyte

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salty sam":dnw5gdcn said:
Is it fairly easy to locate/change the engine fuel filter yourself? I also have a spin on filter in the bilge but it is not a Racor with a drain. Should I consider installing one? My dealer (Tristate) also recommended changing to a 10 micron filter ( I assume this is on the engine) and changing filters every 50 hours. Unless I can do this myself it will be extremely inconvenient as my dealer is not nearby.
John, Servicing the filter is very easy to do.

My filter is located in the area above the bilge pumps, and under the rear deck hatch.
Depending on the model of your boat, yours could be in a different area. Follow the fuel line back from the primer bulb and you'll find it.

Here is my OEM aluminum filter base with a drainable racor filter element.



I replaced the aluminum base this past winter with a stainless steel base (highly recommended in a saltwater environment). My dealer (Tri-State Marine) installed one of the new Yamaha 10 micron filters when they performed the annual spring service.



So yes... If you do not have a 10 micron fuel filter, either a Racor or the new Yamaha filter, you should consider adding one.
If you already have the filter base, spinning on one of the available 10 micron filters is good insurance.

Hope this helps. :)
 

DaleH

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Kevin:

Do you need the metal bowl cartridge because you have your Capt's license :?: ? I know "inspected vessels" for hire can only use full metal bowl fuel/water separators, but thought 6-pack OUPV boats were exempt.

If not, I'd strongly urge you and everyone who is not required by law (inboards and I/Os) to use metal bowl cartridge to switch to the drainable type as shown below. One guy up here with a new Scout boat just delivered from FL has removed 2 gallons of water from 20-something gallons of E10 fuel that was sitting in his tank. He cannot keep the motor running, he has to keep draining the bowl ... but at least with a drainable one, you can do someting beside changing out a complete cartridge. At least with a drainable one, you can see the problem happening too.

These Racors are also 10 Micron aquabloc-rated filter elements.


Replacement cartridges are only $15, see here and if you need the drainable see-thru bowl, you can get both a cartridge and see-thu bowl (clear ones are now available) for only $29.

Note, the S3213 is just an example and may not be the one you need, as different threads are used on the filter head units. If any questions, call Marine Filters and they'll cross-reference your existing cartridge to the head you have and provide you with the right part# filter you need.
 

Megabyte

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Dale, My boat isn't an inspected vessel. In fact, she isn't for hire. :)
I use my license to drive OPB's. (other peoples boats) :D
 

salty sam

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Kevin,
Thanks for the response. My spin on filter is in the bilge area similar to yours. I'll look into replacing with a clear bowl type. I'll have to check with Tristate and see if they used 10 micron this spring. I haven't filled up yet this year so I haven't had to deal directly with the ethanol issue. Couple of follow up questions as I'm new at this one....

What tools are needed to remove the filter? Just a normal strap type filter wrench?

Other than the fuel in the filter, does a good amout of gas come out of the filter cap or lines?

Lastly, what about the filter in the engine itself? Should it be changed out or will the primary filter in the bilge take care of any water?

Obviously, questions from a newbie in this area.....
Thanks,
John
 

SamR

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Super dumb question.... (please take pity)

So a Racor is just a fuel water separator that has a visible reservoir for draining out the collected water? I have a "regular" fuel water filter that is opaque. My marina told me to check it every 30-50 engine hours for water by unscrewing it and checking the contents. Looks like I am going to have to learn a thing or two about engines.
 

TomS

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Sam,

You are correct. The good thing is that you can most likely buy a Racor filter with clear drain/bowl that will screw into the base of your existing opaque filter, providing you have clearance.

-- Tom
 

stonebuster

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I'm happy to see the folks at Parker read the forum. It can only benefit both we owners and Parker Marine also. Good to see Robin posting and participating in the forum!
 

Porkchunker

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Don't forget the filter on the engine. This is what it looks like on my Yami F-115 4-strokes: http://www.maesco.com/products/racor/r_ ... fltr08.gif

This one also happens to be a Racor. The model that is on my motors has a little float that sinks in gas, but floats on water. So...visually one can see if there is water in the bowl. Because I have the larger Racors (like the ones Kevin showed above) in the bilge between the tank and the motors, all of the water seems to get caught there. Have only once seen water in one of these little gizmos.
 

stonebuster

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Megabyte":1bz09bi2 said:
salty sam":1bz09bi2 said:
Is it fairly easy to locate/change the engine fuel filter yourself? I also have a spin on filter in the bilge but it is not a Racor with a drain. Should I consider installing one? My dealer (Tristate) also recommended changing to a 10 micron filter ( I assume this is on the engine) and changing filters every 50 hours. Unless I can do this myself it will be extremely inconvenient as my dealer is not nearby.
John, Servicing the filter is very easy to do.

My filter is located in the area above the bilge pumps, and under the rear deck hatch.
Depending on the model of your boat, yours could be in a different area. Follow the fuel line back from the primer bulb and you'll find it.

Here is my OEM aluminum filter base with a drainable racor filter element.



I replaced the aluminum base this past winter with a stainless steel base (highly recommended in a saltwater environment). My dealer (Tri-State Marine) installed one of the new Yamaha 10 micron filters when they performed the annual spring service.



So yes... If you do not have a 10 micron fuel filter, either a Racor or the new Yamaha filter, you should consider adding one.
If you already have the filter base, spinning on one of the available 10 micron filters is good insurance.

Hope this helps. :)
Is the 3213 Raycor pictured 10 micron?
 

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