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How low can I run my fuel tank?

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96TL

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My dealer advised me to run my tank as low as possible before winter layup due to the problems with E10. I'm going to add Ezorb and Stabil to whatever fuel is left in the tank.

My Yamaha fuel gauge is not accurate at all, but based on my fuel flow guage, I have about 50 gallons left. I have a 150 gallon tank. I'm in the slip until after Thanksgiving weekend and would like to do a few more trips without adding any mroe fuel. I usually burn under 10 gallons per trip. How low do you guys think I can go? Thanks.

Dom
 

cbigma

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Dom,,

I did a lot of this "how many trips left?" stuff this summer while I was burning out the last of the MTBE fuel. My average trip was also about 10 gal burn. I wouldn't take it too close. :(

You never know what situation you are going to run into out there, and you don't want to get caught short. I wouldn't go out unless I had at least twice as much fuel as I needed to get back.

Besides, it's a snap to drain out the last of the fuel when she is out up on blocks, by just disconnecting the fuel line prior to the filter, and starting a siphon. When blocked for the winter, you usually put her nose up a bit to facilitate draining. This puts more fuel in reach of the pickup tube. I took out my last 40 gals this way and put it in my truck.

This way, I figure I left -less- than 10 gals (treated with Stabil) in the tank to over-winter. :lol:

John
 

96TL

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How exactly do you siphon it out? Do you add a hose extension to the Racor filter hose and run it to a fuel tank on the ground? This sounds like a much better idea. I hate the idea of running with the tank really low.
 

cbigma

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96TL":33bt9oz1 said:
How exactly do you siphon it out?

I used this fuel-rated pump that I picked up at Boater's World for my fuel sensor replacement project this summer




You just disconnect the fuel line right before it hits the fuel filter (shown on the left here in the photo)




and attach the intake hose of the pump with a barb-coupler. A couple of strokes, and you start the siphon into a gas can on the ground. I ran the pump intake hose in from the outside up through the bilge drain hole just so I wouldn't have to start the siphon up over the gunnel.

I ran it "dry", but since the pickup tube is about an inch off the bottom of the tank,,, there is still some residual left.

Of course all the safety caveats about handling fuel apply, including not using a flare to check for leaks. :shock:
 

96TL

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Guys, I have another question. It looks like I have an anti-siphon valve on my fuel pickup line. Do I have to remove the sender to siphon the fuel now?
 

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I would assume you would.. at least I did, and that is how I removed the gas from my tank.

One tip if you haven't done it before (I hadn't) make a mark with a sharpie to align the top of the sender with the fuel tank, and also the gasket (once you remove the screws). I found out the hard way that the 5 hole bolt pattern looks symmetrical, but in fact one of the holes is a tiny bit off, so there is only one way the fuel sender and the gasket can be installed. This is to ensure that the fuel sender arm is always pointing in the right direction when it is installed.

I thought that my gasket had shrunk and had a heck of a time getting it back on before a friend of mine clued me in.

-- Tom
 

cbigma

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96TL":2attx2ot said:
It looks like I have an anti-siphon valve on my fuel pickup line.
So,,,,,,, somewhere between 2000 and 2006 Parker started installing anti-siphon valves in the fuel system. :?

A good safety measure I guess, but more than a little frustrating for Dom and others dealing with the side-effects of E-10 fuel, and the need to draw down the tank for winter storage.

Sorry to throw you the curve-ball there Dom, about how easy it is to drain your tank. I had no idea you'd be faced with an A/S valve. :(

The GOOD news is, when you open the sender port to drain the fuel, you'll get a good bird's-eye view of the inside of your tank, and you can visually inspect for evidence of water/sludge/spooge pockets that might have formed following a season of E-10! :shock:

Think how -GOOD- you'll feel knowing that you don't have a lense of gas-snot rolling around in there to spoil next years boating! :lol:

..John
 

96TL

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Thanks for the tips Tom. I have another question. I’ve never removed the sender before. Do I need to apply any gasket sealant to the gasket, or does it seal on its own?

Don’t sweat it John. Thanks for the info though. It’ll still come in handy for members without the a/s valve. Like you mentioned, it’ll be good to actually take a look inside my tank anyway.

Dom
 

DaleH

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96TL":1hfeoora said:
I’ve never removed the sender before. Do I need to apply any gasket sealant to the gasket, or does it seal on its own?
I for one would NEVER reseal any fuel gasket, even if new, without applying some Permatex #2 to both sides of the gasket and the bottom of the flange. I even go as far as to thread the bolts in loose and apply some to the threads.
 

96TL

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DaleH":20zydusj said:
96TL":20zydusj said:
I’ve never removed the sender before. Do I need to apply any gasket sealant to the gasket, or does it seal on its own?
I for one would NEVER reseal any fuel gasket, even if new, without applying some Permatex #2 to both sides of the gasket and the bottom of the flange. I even go as far as to thread the bolts in loose and apply some to the threads.
That's what I needed to know. Thanks Dale!!!!!!
 

DaleH

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I've never ever had a problem re-using them, again - always sealed with P'tex #2.

Note:
The 5-holes in the bolt pattern of the fuel sender is unique ... the 5 holes are NOT equally spaced. This means there is only 1 correct orientation to put it on, this is done to ensure the float points to the correct direction needed for use.



You would be wise ;) to mark the sender flange to the tank before you remove it and double-check that the gasket is also in the right position before re-installing.
 
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