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Trailering

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Dabbie7

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Anybody know how to deal with this issue - my 2310 sits on a roller trailler rather than a bunk trailer. When you go to launch, you can't release the bow eye-hook from the trailer cable before you back in as she would roll right off as soon as you got on the slope of the ramp. I usually release a foot or so of slack before backing down onto the ramp, then I back in and once it's down in deep enough to release, you have to have two people, one in the boat starting her up and moving up to take the slack out of the cable, and one to get wet walking into the water to actually release the cable. Same goes for getting her back on the roller trailer, one to run her up on the trailer and one to get wet and hook the cable to the bow hook.

Is there a quick release mechanism of some sort that could be used to unhook the cable? Maybe pulled from the dock to release? I realize there are probably a dozen knots out there that one would be able to release with a pull of the tag end, but it just seems so risky. Ay ideas?

I want to be able to launch and put her back on the trailer by myself or at least with the help of one of the kids.
 

Ranger Tim

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My rollers tend to want to ROLL! whenever I get the boat on the ramp. I tie off the boat from a bow cleat to the pier and run the rope around the piling once before tying off to the winch post. Use a knot with a quick release loop at the winch post. Let her out a couple feet until the rope holds the boat, then undo the winch cable. Grab the rope and pull the quick release knot free, letting her slide into the water slowly -- the loop around the piling should allow you to regulate the speed sufficiently. (Be sure you loop the boat to a piling well forward of the boat, not right beside it.) Throw the line to the kids/friendswhen she slows to a stop off the rollers.

Don't make the mistake of lubing the rollers excessively or you will fight this every time you launch. I did this and am paying the price! I have since been spraying brake cleaner on them periodically to try to remove as much lubricant as possible.

Loading is a two person operation when power loading. I would never let my kids get near the boat winch while I am powering her up the trailer. When I am by myself I usually use my "Captain Hook" to clip the boat to the winch cable, then crank her up all the way. Once in a while another boater will volunteer to clip you in so that you can power load.

I have also found that (if I have time and the ramp's not busy) if I leave the boat two feet off the bow roller, pull the truck up until the boat is mostly out of the water, then crank it in the remaining distance, she will self correct for any weird leaning or off center position. This "lean" or "off-center" load used to plague me on several rather poor ramps or when the wind would push the boat around while loading. Sometimes heavy passengers remaining on board will cause this. I hate looking at my boat on the trailer when it is not centered, not to mention when the raw water pick-up is resting directly on a roller. :evil:

Late striper season here in the lower Chesapeake is a great time to see excellent examples of the fine art of trailering. The cold weather brings out only the accomplished fishermen that have more experience loading and unloading at the ramps. It resembles a finely tuned ballet that is a testament to human cooperation and civilized behavior... for the most part. I was 8th in line on Sunday to get out and was out of the water in less than twenty minutes. There were only two lanes serving the loading crowd at Lynnhaven and things ran like clockwork.

Now the summer season, that's a completely different planet....
 

Dabbie7

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Ranger Tim, thanks for taking the time to reply. Some great ideas! I just wish I had the trailer buying experience to do over again, I would definitely go for a bunk style trailer. Hey, one other question, any problem with leaving her on the trailer through the winter months, four months max? Thank you!
 

Porkchunker

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I single launch/recover all the time. The only way for me to do this easily was to put the tall PVC guides on the side of the trailer, and go to 40' dock lines.

I tie off the transom dock line to a piling/chock back far enough and loose enough to allow the boat to completely come off the trailer. I keep the bow line in my hand, wade into the water, release the brake on the electric winch, and let the boat roll down until she is floating. I unhook the winch cable and drape it back over the winch post. While doing this the PVC guides keep the boat from floating into the dock or away from the dock into the other pier or another boat trying to launch/recover.

Once the boat is free and floating, I walk back up the ramp, get onto the pier (this is where the 40' dock lines come in handy), down the pier, and pull the boat back away from the trailer. By the time the bowsprit clears the PVC guides, I'm back to where I can pick up the transom line and walk the boat back down the pier and away from the trailer.

I don't power load, so recovering is almost the reverse of launching. The electric winch comes in handy. I have a 25' piece of 1/4" line attached to a key-chain style quick disconnect that goes on the winch switch. I can run the winch standing on the pier next to the boat.

Next time I'm out, I'll try to remember to take pictures.
 

Dabbie7

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Porkchunker, thanks for the info, I got it until you get to the part about unhooking the winch cable from the bow once you have let her slide down into the water? How do you get to it without going underwater? From the dock? Haven't had an electric winch on a boat trailer in years, but I seem to remember a wheel you turned and in effect released the brake in the winch, so I assume you are doing the same thing and letting the cable just unwind out of the winch as the boat slides down the trailer, is this right? So the question is how do you release the winch cable from the bow?

Same thing loading, how do you hook the winch cable to the bow? I guess once you have the cable connected, you are able to push the boat over and into position and then hit the winch button to get her started up the trailer?

One thing I think I do that makes loading actually harder is putting the trailer to far down in the water. It makes it difficult to get it loaded level on the trailer. I have a tandem trailer and I pretty much put the back fender about 4" underwater and power load her and have someone hook the winch cable when she gets close. Never struck me as particularly safe though.... I like your idea on not power loading. Any ideas on a good electric winch manufacturer/model. Thanks and by the way, I'm over in your area all the time, I work out of Landover and have an office in Seaford DE as well, so cut across the bay bridge etc. Do you head south this time of year and hit the NC coast for the ocean striper run?
 

Ranger Tim

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Dabbie7,

I have copied the previous post I made above that addresses the fix I have for the power load- lean problem;

I have also found that (if I have time and the ramp's not busy) if I leave the boat two feet off the bow stop, pull the truck up until the boat is mostly out of the water, then crank it in the remaining distance, she will self correct for any weird leaning or off center position. This "lean" or "off-center" load used to plague me on several rather poor ramps or when the wind would push the boat around while loading. Sometimes heavy passengers remaining on board will cause this.
It really does work for my trailer, maybe it will for yours also. It just takes a few feet of additional cranking when the truck is pulled up some. Try it and see if it works for you.

By the way, I ain't getting into the water to clip the winch cable this time of year for anyone! Tooooo cold! It's either power load or "Captain Hook" and crank.
 

Porkchunker

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Dabbie7":28z89sn3 said:
Porkchunker, thanks for the info, I got it until you get to the part about unhooking the winch cable from the bow once you have let her slide down into the water? How do you get to it without going underwater? From the dock?...

Same thing loading, how do you hook the winch cable to the bow? I guess once you have the cable connected, you are able to push the boat over and into position and then hit the winch button to get her started up the trailer?

One thing I think I do that makes loading actually harder is putting the trailer to far down in the water. It makes it difficult to get it loaded level on the trailer. I have a tandem trailer and I pretty much put the back fender about 4" underwater and power load her and have someone hook the winch cable when she gets close. Never struck me as particularly safe though.... I like your idea on not power loading.

Any ideas on a good electric winch manufacturer/model. Thanks and by the way, I'm over in your area all the time, I work out of Landover and have an office in Seaford DE as well, so cut across the bay bridge etc. Do you head south this time of year and hit the NC coast for the ocean striper run?
First...I wade into the water to both unhook at launch and rehook at recovery. In the spring and late fall/early winter, I use hip waders. In the summer I use my boat shoes. I refuse to power-load on a roller trailer, because too many things can go wrong...like have a roller fall off and have the hanger gouge the hull.

If the ramp is not level, the boat will not load properly centered when the trailer is backed in deep. My 2510 loads centered on a level ramp when the trailer is backed down until the fenders are just under water. If the ramp is not level, I start the boat onto the trailer with the fenders under water, then when the boat is about 1/2 way up the trailer, I move the trailer up the ramp a few feet until the fenders are about 6" out of the water. She will then self center on the rollers even on a tipped ramp.

I am now out of Solomons all year long. I move the boat to the Norfolk area in late Nov or early Dec to support a couple of trips to the CBBT, then bring her back home for service and a winter cover.

WRT an electric winch, I'm using a PowerWinch 4000, with the cable doubled through a single pully. Seems to work ok and is about 3 seasons old now. Haven't serviced it, but plan to do so next spring before it goes into operation. I have a smaller version on the trailer for the woodie. Dad built a tilting trailer for that boat, and cranking it up by hand is a real chore.
 

Phil

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I have a 2320 and a roller trailer and launch/retreive solo without getting wet. The rear keel roller on my trailer is bent from the weight of the boat preventing the boat from rolling off. I replaced the bent roller which allowed the boat to roll, but I found like you did that it was difficult to retrieve the boat. So I put the bent roller back on and been using it like that ever since...

I suggest you build a small keel bunk at the rear of the trailer from off-the-shelf brackets. The bunk will prevent the boat from rolling of the trailer until the boat is submerged deep enough the lift the stern off the bunk.
 

Dabbie7

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thanks for the advice guys. Phil, I don't know if I could watch 60k worth of boat holding on by a bunk at the rear of the trailer, but that does deserve some thought....

Porkchunker, you're exactly right, I've been lowering my trailer down to far. Need to do it just the way you describe. Is your Powerwinch a model number 4000? Don't see it on their website. I was looking at a new model they have, the RC 30, rated at 11,500 pounds for about $336, $350 with shipping. Has a pretty slick wireless remote that would make loading by yourself pretty easy. They have another model, the RC 23, rated at 7500 pounds, but only $30 cheaper. Any idea what yours is rated? I am going to guess that with a 2510 a 4000 lb winch wouldn't cut it, but have no idea if that is what a Powerwinch 4000 is rated.
 

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