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Changing oil in a 4-stroke

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Porkchunker

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Last time I had the oil changed in my twin F-115 Yami 4-strokes, I about had a heart-attack when I got the bill. Decided it was time to do this myself.

I got the oil and filters from Tri-State Marine in Deale, MD the a couple of weeks back. First problem I had was getting the filter off. Had to hunt to find the right tool. Because of the location of the filter, you can't easily use a regular oil filter wrench. Best approach is to get the right tool.

Once the filters, oil, and tools are on hand, the easiest way to do this is to pump the oil out of the engine, rather than use the drain plug. Was told by the mechs at both Fairwinds Marina and Tri-State to pump the oil out with a hand pump rather than use the drain plug...that is unless you want a really big mess and a hard time getting the drain plug back in.

So... the following pics show the process:
1. Warm up the motors,
2. Pump the oil out of the motor thorugh the dipstick hole,
3. Raise the motor for 30-60 seconds to drain the oil out of the cavities in the block,
4. Lower the motor to level and pump what remains out,
5. Remove the oil filter (paper towels below the filter help a lot),
6. Replace the filter,
7. Fill with fresh oil (4.8 qts in the case of the F-115).
8. Run the engines for a couple of minutes,
9. Raise the motor for 30-60 seconds to drain the oil out of the cavities in the block,
10. Check the dipstick for proper level.

In the case of my F-115s, I put a 1 gal jug, followed by 700 ml from a 1 qt. bottle. Oil level was right on the middle of the dipstick.

I can't say enough about the proper way to check the oil in these Yami 4-strokes...especially the F-115. You absolutely must raise the engines as high as they will go for 30-60 seconds, lower to level, and then check the oil. The Yami F-115 is famous for the "making oil" problem. Most of it can be traced to the fact that the power head holds oil high out of the pan, which will cause a low reading. The owner adds oil, thinking he needs to, when in fact he has now over-filled it.
 

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Megabyte

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Nice job Dave. You're as bad as me with your photo documentation. :)
(and I believe that is a good thing!)

So did the coffee go into the motor too? 8)
 

cbigma

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Excellent Post Dave!

I have a 2-stroke so I have never seen this done before, but I was wondering how tough it would be. It looks like most of this could be done at a slip, as long as your Marina didn't have a prohibition against it. :roll:

Some car mfgs used to put a magnetized tip on the lower drain plug to scavenge any steel filings that may be sloshing around in the oil. Any idea if Yamaha does this on their lower drain plug? Or maybe there aren't enough moving parts made with steel in the Yam to worry about?

Great photos,, (I almost feel like I have done it myself after reading the post) and great tips on capturing the true liquid level reading, and using the right tools. :D

Thanks for adding to the Classic Parker Archive! :D

John
 

Porkchunker

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cbigma":3ka84f6q said:
...Some car mfgs used to put a magnetized tip on the lower drain plug to scavenge any steel filings that may be sloshing around in the oil. Any idea if Yamaha does this on their lower drain plug? Or maybe there aren't enough moving parts made with steel in the Yam to worry about?...
Oh...there are plenty of moving parts to create filings. Hadn't thought about that magnetized plug. Guess I'll go ask Harvey at Tri-State about if that plug has a magnet, and how often it should be removed. Maybe every 3rd or 4th oil change? Maybe at the 200, 400, 600 ... hour services?
 

stonebuster

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Porkchunker":30lkd3vf said:
cbigma":30lkd3vf said:
...Some car mfgs used to put a magnetized tip on the lower drain plug to scavenge any steel filings that may be sloshing around in the oil. Any idea if Yamaha does this on their lower drain plug? Or maybe there aren't enough moving parts made with steel in the Yam to worry about?...
Oh...there are plenty of moving parts to create filings. Hadn't thought about that magnetized plug. Guess I'll go ask Harvey at Tri-State about if that plug has a magnet, and how often it should be removed. Maybe every 3rd or 4th oil change? Maybe at the 200, 400, 600 ... hour services?
Don't know if plug is magnatized, but I pump my oil out every 50hrs. in my slip, and drain the oil through the plug and refill while out of the water for winter layup. If I trailered my boat, I'd drain it out instead of pumping. I think you get more oil out draining it vs. pumping. Also if you let too much time lapse before draining (years), you might have a hard time removing it.
 

greatcir

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Since I'm in a slip on a lift most of the time, I called Yammie and they said no problem sucking the oil out the dip stick for oil changes. I have the service manuel on my engine and it shows the same Moeller extraction tank I use.

http://www.foreandaftmarine.com/MO-33330.htm

The Moeller is fairly clear so can easily see oil coming out and filling tank. Since I held a bit more oil than the Moller could hold, I stopped and poured some into an plastic jar then finished the extraction without spilling a drop.

To drain and change the gear lube, I used the deck of a pontoon boat under my engine and no problem. Even when I trimmed the motor down no additional lube came out the drain hole, so seems to work okay. The drain plug did have some metal slivers on it as I just finished my 10 hour break in period. May pull this plug again before the 100 hour change.
 

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Ranger Tim

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Don't freak out when you crank up the motor after changing oil and filter! Often, the low oil alarm will sound before the oil gets up into the head. The indicator will not clear until the ignition is turned off and on again. The horn only sounds for a very brief moment. It doesn't always happen either.

I have never pumped the oil out, yet have not had many problems with the plug draining process. It is important to have a bucket up close under the hole, with the drain hose (F150) directed into the bucket, for the least messy result. I often use a teenager or some other gullable assistant to hold it until the draining has slowed to a slow drip. Otherwise the oil runs down the lower unit.

I change oil on warm days, when running the engine is not as important. That way I can change the filter on the F150 without loading it first. No oil is spilled this way (it is mounted facing down). You may use a Glad bag to catch the oil if you drain it hot. Rags placed underneath will usually suffice.

Why pay someone to do this when it is so easy? The hard part is pulling out the wallet for the Yamalube and filter! Be sure to always use a new gasket when draining by plug.
 

greatcir

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The engine gent I talked to at Yammie said they had not tested synthetics but added that all the oil had to do was to meet the specifications designated for the engine.

Since I'll change oil & filter at 100 hours and I want no question about honoring my factory 6 year new engine warranty, I went with the Yammie oil I bought from my dealer with the boat. Now I have the receipt and photos for the 10 hour break in period oil chahge.
 

Porkchunker

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My starboard engine has a bit of the "making oil" problem. Volume increases over time, but does not show fuel dilution (per oil analysis). It does show some sodium contamination, which means that I may be getting some saltwater in the oil. Not enough to make the oil milky (it is as black as the port motor which does not show the problem).

Since I now change the oil every 50 hours, the cost of synthetic oil is prohibitive.
 

goinsfishin

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I wet slip and am very leery of spilling into the creek I live on, so every 50 hours I pull boat, change oil and filter, Hit the hull crud with a powerwasher on low setting, touch up the bottom paint if needed. let dry a few minutes and back in. Total time expended last time was slightly over 2 hours. Change the gear oil every fall as part of winterizing. Good to go on that first nice weather !
BTW - the drain plug on my F115 is magnetized, has always been clean.
 

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