Quantcast

So, just how THICK is your Parker glass layup?

Classic Parker

Help Support Classic Parker:

DaleH

FOUNDER of Classic Parker Forum
Moderator
Joined
Feb 16, 2006
Messages
4,651
Reaction score
15
Location
Newbury, MA
FYI ... all photos from a '92 vintage Sport Cabin.



Not only are they built tough, the quality of the hand layup of fiberglass reinforced plastic (frp) is quite evident. Only "small" issue I see is what appears to be a gelcoat line where the top 5/16" thick overlay on the roof overhang joined to the main thickness of the roof. The pieces are not separated, but there is a clean break, right on the gelcoat line (if that's what it is). But as long as everything is fully encapsulated in glass, which it is, all should be sound.

This is just a little habit I have ... doing projects and cutting major holes in my baby ... but at least I save the pieces for evidence ;) ! These are from my '92 vintage 2520 mod-V sport cabin.

Edit: Re-added picture after server change ...
 

Outta Here

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 6, 2006
Messages
1,039
Reaction score
0
One foot foreward of transom, and one foot starboard of keel...

9/16"...solid fiberglass, no fillers, no foam, no mustard or
onions! :wink:


The 23 DV's stay in the mold for 1 week. I'll bet that slows production, or they have a lot of molds.
 

Megabyte

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 16, 2006
Messages
10,543
Reaction score
1
Location
Lewes, DE
I thought I was the only one who saved my plugs. :D
I'll have to photograph mine and post em in this thread. :)
 

John_Madison CT

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 17, 2006
Messages
732
Reaction score
1
Location
Madison, CT
Somewhere I have my transom plug for when I installed the wires/cables/hose for my fully remote kicker.

It's damn thick, but a buddy who works at the marina claims it isn't marine plywood. :cry: :cry:
 

ppem45

Well-known member
Joined
May 6, 2008
Messages
426
Reaction score
0
Location
Charlestown RI
I have the plug from the transom where the wiring for the engine runs through to the engine. We ran it into the seat on the starboard side and out thru the transom inside the seat and the plug measures a strong two and a half inches. It is a real strong plug, I really didn't think it was that thick.
 

Attachments

ppem45

Well-known member
Joined
May 6, 2008
Messages
426
Reaction score
0
Location
Charlestown RI
Thanks Dale, I sure missed this. It sure makes it easier to win an argument when your buddy owns a Grady and your arguing about which is thicker and better built.
 

crabber93

Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2010
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
my 89 commerical 2520 has a 3.5 inch transom,and is 1.25 inches in the hull @14 inches from centerline have plugs to prove it i installed engine and drive myself,bougth hul,deck and copit sole set up for stern drive ,finish off chesapeake stile derise cabin have 14.6 ft of copit length sorry no one sells them like that now days
 

Jtwo

Active member
Joined
Jan 25, 2010
Messages
35
Reaction score
0
Location
California
This is the hull plug (for ducer) from our 1998 Parker 2520 SCDV. Offical thickness is 9/16" on one edge and 5/8" on the other edge. I think the plug grabbed a layup near the centerline which added the extra 16th. You can see the gel coat on top, lot'o glass, a thinner layer of gel coat on the bottom and bottom paint about the thickness of paper on the very bottom (looks like a shadow). The dime is 11/16" tall.

Jtwo
 

Attachments

UnWired

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 12, 2007
Messages
106
Reaction score
0
Location
Fortuna, California
What year did they start putting double sided fiberglass on the cockpit decking? Is this just inside of the pilot house, or is this an issue with the entire deck also?

Seems like it would be a problem, because there can be considerable water inside of the bilge area at times. Has anyone noted any wood rot when they cut a plug? I know they changed the design to double sided fiberglass, but I am unsure of the year.
Thanks for any responses.
 

Jtwo

Active member
Joined
Jan 25, 2010
Messages
35
Reaction score
0
Location
California
UnWired said:
What year did they start putting double sided fiberglass on the cockpit decking?

Seems like it would be a problem, because there can be considerable water inside of the bilge area at times. Has anyone noted any wood rot when they cut a plug?
Unwired -

Check the following thread - viewtopic.php?f=8&t=2759&start=0 and go to bottom of page 1 - picture of total deck rot and water under the tank.

That is our 1998 2520 DV. Eric at Parker thought 1996 to 1998 was when they started glassing the bottom of the deck. However, there is a gap in the glass between core sections and the ends of the core are not sealed - so water can run around and what is not soaked up, spills out on to the tank.

You can see from the picture here (of the underside of the deck that was cut off over the tank) the dark streaks are where water was in the wood. Came from unsealed inspection ports. You can also see a 'repair' done by a broker who was really only fixing the tip of the iceberg...so to speak. Further aft of the tank, there was poor installation of deck chairs. That is the really black patches just evident at teh bottom of the cut. I could push my finger through a 1" piece of wood core. Whole deck is now being replaced. It will be glassed on both sides.

No glass on the bottom would keep bad installs from being 'pandemic' by not trapping water leaking through, but would also absorb moisture from both sides. Double sided is the way to go and make sure you have copious amounts of sealant IN THE HOLE before you send it. A little silicone around the edge does nothing to stop the water.

Good boat building is no match for a poor install.

Jtwo
 

Attachments

UnWired

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 12, 2007
Messages
106
Reaction score
0
Location
Fortuna, California
Thanks for the reply. So, I have a 2001, which I was cleaning the bilge area out thoroughly and filled the boat with water, dawn soap and lots of bleach to kill mildew which has been growing inside the bilge box. The boat was filled pretty full, so I put 2 heaters inside cabin and a light inside of the box in back to hopefully dry out the moisture.

I wonder if they fixed this by 2001, or if I have to look forward to removing the entire deck of the boat as you have. Is there any way to get into the fuel tank area, less cutting a hole? Maybe remove the rub rail, separate the cabin, then take a vertical lift to separate the two boat halves and hoist it vertical to take a look ? May be costly to do so, but I have a couple of other projects to do when I separate the cab.
 

UnWired

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 12, 2007
Messages
106
Reaction score
0
Location
Fortuna, California
John_Madison CT":3ct5lpbu said:
Somewhere I have my transom plug for when I installed the wires/cables/hose for my fully remote kicker.

It's damn thick, but a buddy who works at the marina claims it isn't marine plywood. :cry: :cry:
I called Parker regarding the Marine Grade plywood statement... they told me that they have always used Marine Grade ply. Even their FAQ section states that they use marine grade fir ply.
http://www.parkerboats.net/pages/faqs/a ... sp?faqid=3

Also, a quote from the transom contruction:
"This high-grade, 14-ply marine-grade fir plywood completely encased in fiberglass exceeds Parker's requirements for long-term durability and satisfaction. A total laminate combination of fiberglass mat, woven roven, polyester, bonding putty and marine grade plywood exceeds 22 plys."
http://www.parkerboats.net/pages/faqs/a ... p?faqid=14

Not sure where you got that info.. but you might want to correct him.
 

Megabyte

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 16, 2006
Messages
10,543
Reaction score
1
Location
Lewes, DE
UnWired":2y02umxz said:
Is there any way to get into the fuel tank area, less cutting a hole? Maybe remove the rub rail, separate the cabin, then take a vertical lift to separate the two boat halves and hoist it vertical to take a look ? May be costly to do so, but I have a couple of other projects to do when I separate the cab.
I wish there were, but I think cutting the deck is the only way.
Boats with "tank hatch covers" always seem to leak and are always a source of problems.
I'm much happier with a solid deck.

That said, my boat was originally ordered by someone with 3 fuel tanks and I only ever use the single 127 gal main tank.
The two 47 gal wing tanks were only used once... when I bought the boat.
221 gallons of fuel weighs a little less than 1,500 pounds.
You can imagine what it was like trying to get her on plane the first time out. :shock:

I'd love to pull those two unused tanks, piping, and wiring out of there and realize a weight savings
Removing 4 inspection hatches from the deck and 2 fills from the washboards would be a plus too. 8)
 

miky2884

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 27, 2010
Messages
1,469
Reaction score
0
Location
Westbrook CT
here is only about 3/4 of the plug that came out of the gunnel of my 2320. very impressed with the thickness
the other picture was what was left still in the hole
 

Attachments

96TL

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 27, 2006
Messages
784
Reaction score
0
Location
Brooklyn, NY USA
Dale,

How thick are the sides of the cabin? 5/16"?

I am thinking of mounting a battery charger inside in that area, but I'm worried about it being too thin for the screws to get a good bite. Maybe I can cut out some carpet and epoxy a piece of plywood and screw into that?

Thanks.

 

Bryan 2530

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 5, 2006
Messages
3,536
Reaction score
0
Location
Westbrook CT
I doubt you have enough material there on the 2320 to sink a screw, I know my 2530 doesn't and Miky's older 2320 doesn't either.

You going to have to epoxy a board in or through bolt if you don't mind seeing the head of the bolt.
 

bigk23surf

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 14, 2008
Messages
113
Reaction score
0
Location
Ocean City, MD
96TL":1fp4e5sm said:
Dale,

How thick are the sides of the cabin? 5/16"?

I am thinking of mounting a battery charger inside in that area, but I'm worried about it being too thin for the screws to get a good bite. Maybe I can cut out some carpet and epoxy a piece of plywood and screw into that?

Thanks.


That is where I mounted my outriggers. I would say its about 1/4" think, maybe a little less. I don't think you have enough to screw into.
 

Latest posts

Top