Parker 1800 1998.

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Matt DiSabatino

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Hello all. I am the owner of a 1998 1800 I am considering cutting out the deck and changing the fuel tank out. Does anyone have any advice? My hull is in excellent condition. The boat was repowered in 2010 with a Yamaha 150. I also added trim tabs at that time. Best 18’ skiff on the water in my opinion. I am concerned about a funky bilge smell. Local dealer believes that’s all it is. I plan on keeping the boat for the inevitable future and feel the fuel tank upgrade would be well worth the effort.
 

Puck-n-Fish

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Mines a 1997, and although I have not had any tank issues as of yet, I would not be all that eager to tackle a project like that without solid proof of a problem. If if will make you feel better, by all means carry on! My approach has been to read as much as I can from all the old posts dealing with this, get the process figured out in my head, and be ready to go when or if I have to cross that bridge. Besides, a smelly bilge could be something else that's hiding down there. If your smelling gas fumes then that's a whole different story.
 

tomc585

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You could always do a LOW presure test. But beware, It may not have a leak but may as a result of the test if the condition of the tank is questionable.
 

DanLovingood

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Matt,

Welcome to Classic Parker! I have owned a 1990 1800 for 25 years and definately agree with you that it is the best 18 foot skiff available. I had my boat rebuilt and repowered in 2018 with a 115 Mercury Four Stroke and replaced the gas tank at that time. I inspected the tank interior before replacement and it looked like new but thought it was time for a new tank after 28 years of service and this was the perfect time to do it. I had my local dealer, Nansemond Marine in Suffolk, VA do the work as they have much experience in rigging and repairing these boats. Attached are a couple of photos of the deck cutout and the removed tank. They had the new tank fabricated once they had the old tank out to match the exact dimensions.

Cap'n Dan
 

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pelagic2530

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Matt,

The biggest issue in replacing the tank in a CC is that the console is going to have to come off the boat, and all the rigging will need to be disconnected or replaced. On the bright side, it's a great time to tackle any rigging projects you may want to do (new steering, battery relocation, etc.). On the downside, it's a ROYAL pain in the a$$. I actually had my 1700 tank done at Nansemond Marine, same as Cap'n Dan, and they also did a great job. If you're local to southern VA, it's a great option. If you're going to do it yourself, just be prepared to remove the console and all rigging.

However, before you do that, do yourself a favor and check ALL other aspects of your fuel system. Check your fuel fill and vent lines. Check your fuel pickup hoses. Check your fuel sender gasket. Check EVERYTHING that touches fuel and might be causing a leak. Replacing those things is a relatively minor expense; replacing the tank is going to take a long time and cost a lot of money. Not something I would do based on what a dealer thinks is "probably" the issue.

Can you describe the "funky smell" you've got in your bilge, and why you think it's related to a leaking tank? While you're in range to need a new tank, there are many who have had tanks live longer than that, as well as a couple members who have replaced functioning tanks to find out they had a bad hose, gasket, loose hose clamp, etc. It's worth the time to check out all options.
 

Matt DiSabatino

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Hey guys...this is awesome information. I really appreciate the feedback.

I do believe that the smell is gas. That's my opinion. My service people are telling me its old bilge smell. The smell inside of the console is constant and is prevalent whenever you open the side door. I did have a bad leak in my water fuel separator system several years ago which resulted in a lot of fuel in the bilge. I would have thought the effects of that would have subsided by now if that were the cause.

I replaced the fuel sender last fall. I am in the process of checking all other parts of fuel system (hoses, connections, vents, etc.). Part of me wants to go for the tank exchange now because I have the ttop off and I wouldn't mind looking into replacing a lot of wiring/rigging. Not to mention make the new tank smaller. I have a local friend who has replaced many tanks and has a lot of fiberglass experience so I feel confident about the work getting done correctly. I guess the big question I have is, will the smell cease if in fact it is a leak in the system not the tank. Probably a tough one to answer.

I'm sure I will have more questions along the way.
 
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Matt DiSabatino

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Another question.....has anyone ever relocated or modified the switch panel in the console? That thing is difficult to work with...tight. I feel like I don't need the space inside of the console cabinet. It seems like a good idea to make the cabinet smaller to create space so you can get your hands behind the switches to make upgrades or changes.
 

Huffinator18

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I actually just bought a new switch panel from New Wire Marine , with lit switches to install on the console. I am building a panel with a battery switch and isolator to put in place of the old switch panel inside the console.


I am also in the process of re-wiring everything. I found a light green wire laying in the bilge, it comes from under the gas tank area , in the middle, not thru the rigging tubes. Does anyone know if that wire is a bonding wire for the fuel tank ? Where does it bond to ? Mine was just laying in the hull

I appreciate any help
 

pelagic2530

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Another question.....has anyone ever relocated or modified the switch panel in the console? That thing is difficult to work with...tight. I feel like I don't need the space inside of the console cabinet. It seems like a good idea to make the cabinet smaller to create space so you can get your hands behind the switches to make upgrades or changes.
Matt, not sure exactly what your current switch panel looks like, but I recently replaced my switch panel (along with the rest of my electrical system) with a new one from New Wire Marine. Check out my ‘97 1700 Overhaul thread in the projects forum, might be helpful to your situation.
 

Fishaddict

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I think green is ground for tank. It goes to -ve of the battery.
 

Makida

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I re-wired my 1800 last year and used a Blue-Sea-Systems-WeatherDeck Waterproof Panel. I found a green wire laying in the bilge also! As Fishaddict stated, it goes to the ground for the fuel tank. I believe I traced it up to the port side fuel fill. Definitely check out pelagic2530’s rebuild/rewire. Lots of great info and detail. It was my inspiration to do mine but I did a “basic” rewire compared to pelagic2530.
 

tomc585

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Thats how it is on my 1801. Independent green wires from port side fill to ground tab at sending unit and another from bildge area to the same tab.
 

pelagic2530

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As stated, any green wiring on a 12v boat should be for the bonding system. Commonly you’ll have one from the fuel tank tab to the battery negative terminal, and possibly one from the fuel fill fitting to the tank tab. The fill fitting bonding may be accomplished with internal wire mesh inside the fill hose, but a dedicated wire is the better option.

Of note if you’re rewiring, is that current ABYC standards call for bonding wire of at least 8AWG size, which is comparatively beefy. Many older systems use 10 or 12, which is fine so long as it corresponds with the regulations at the time the boat was built. But if you’re replacing it, go with 8.
 

GoodChance

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As stated, any green wiring on a 12v boat should be for the bonding system. Commonly you’ll have one from the fuel tank tab to the battery negative terminal, and possibly one from the fuel fill fitting to the tank tab. The fill fitting bonding may be accomplished with internal wire mesh inside the fill hose, but a dedicated wire is the better option.

Of note if you’re rewiring, is that current ABYC standards call for bonding wire of at least 8AWG size, which is comparatively beefy. Many older systems use 10 or 12, which is fine so long as it corresponds with the regulations at the time the boat was built. But if you’re replacing it, go with 8.
8 gauge??? That's almost big enough to use as a starting cable (almost). I can't imagine any situation on a sub-60ft boat that you'd need 8 gauge to carry the milli-amps of stray current generated by electrolysis. 12 gauge should be PLENTY big enough.
 

pelagic2530

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8 gauge??? That's almost big enough to use as a starting cable (almost). I can't imagine any situation on a sub-60ft boat that you'd need 8 gauge to carry the milli-amps of stray current generated by electrolysis. 12 gauge should be PLENTY big enough.
GC, I’m thinking you’re right. I know I got the 8AWG size from SOMEwhere, but I can’t seem to find the standard that says so now that I’m looking for it. I’ll keep looking, but neither H-24 or E-11 seem to specify. Interesting.
 

pelagic2530

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GC, I’m thinking you’re right. I know I got the 8AWG size from SOMEwhere, but I can’t seem to find the standard that says so now that I’m looking for it. I’ll keep looking, but neither H-24 or E-11 seem to specify. Interesting.
@GoodChance, I found it! I was in the wrong bonding standard. E-2 calls for 8AWG in the CATHODIC bonding system, if installed; 6AWG if tied in with a lightning protection system.

The only size specification for DC Grounding/Bonding in the case of the tank is that the tank shall be connected to the boat’s negative bus so that resistance between the two is less than 1 ohm. It also specifies that the metallic deck fill must be incorporated as well. I agree, in boats this size, 12AWG is likely just fine.

For electrical grounding, the size of the grounding connectors shall be not less than one size smaller than the current-carrying conductors. The biggest application for this in boats of our size would be the “grounding screw” connections found on most electronics.

My apologies for the bad information!
 

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